‘Thank You’ Is Just the Beginning

first_imgAcross the company, our leaders are excited for this day and its three main goals:Celebrate EMC’s customer-centric cultureRecognize EMC’s passionate and committed employeesGain insights from customers and employees to continuously improve the EMC experienceYour feedback and experience matters and I hope that you will join us for our virtual celebration on October 7th, where you will hear from EMC leaders, customers and employees and have the opportunity to share your perspective via a Live Q&A discussion with EMC experts.Just as we hope to share our approach with you, we are very interested to learn how you are innovating the experience for your customers. We can only get better when we work together—so please come celebrate with us!On behalf of EMC’s leadership team, I sincerely say “Thank you”. This is just the beginning to an enduring partnership ahead. Whether you have invested in a global infrastructure using a broad set of solutions from EMC and our Federation partners, or are just in the preliminary conversations about the right product and service mix for your environment, we appreciate your willingness to give EMC the opportunity to earn your business.We do not take for granted that you have a choice in which technology vendor you choose.  Therefore, every interaction with our company is a new opportunity for us to prove how we will engage, enable, and evolve with you. Thank you for your trust and partnership and for believing in EMC.I recently had the opportunity to discuss the customer experience with Bill Fandrich, SVP and CIO of Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Massachusetts, a premier healthcare company.  Bill shared the pressure faced by CIOs to be more efficient and effective and how partnering with EMC helped BCBS in its IT transformation. He also discussed how that transformation has allowed BCBS to deliver a better experience to its customers. To watch the full interview, click here.As an industry leader, it is so important to listen to the needs of our customers—to make sure that both their challenges and business initiatives are  understood. These personal insights, combined with robust analytics and feedback mechanisms, are what allow EMC to continuously improve and innovate the customer experience.Total Customer Experience DayOn October 7, 2014, EMC will be sponsoring our Total Customer Experience Day event—a global celebration of our commitment to customers. The day will include a virtual celebration hosted on the EMC Community Network, open to customers and employees, as well as onsite events at 10+ EMC campuses in 7 countries—Egypt, China, India, Singapore, Ireland, Russia and the US. Not only will EMC celebrate on this day, but we join other companies around the world who also recognize the importance of a great customer experience and take time to celebrate as part of “CX (Customer Experience) Day”.last_img read more

Rakia Reynolds, Face of Dell for Small Business, Drops in at Dell HQ

first_imgA recent visitor to Dell’s main campus just outside Austin, Texas turned several heads.She was a face very familiar to Dell team members, although most had never met her in person. Dressed in her typically bold style – a brightly patterned suit – team members peeked out of their desks to meet her as she walked the halls of Dell’s headquarters.Rakia Reynolds is the face of Dell for Small Business appearing in print, video, and digital ads. She was even featured in this Dell for Small Business billboard in Brooklyn, New York (below).But Reynolds isn’t a professional model. She’s president and founder of Skai Blue Media, a multimedia public relations agency with an all-star roster of lifestyle, technology and fashion clients. And, she’s a real Dell customer.“We are living in a mobile economy and my laptop is my office,” Reynolds says. “When I got the XPS 13, I was impressed because it had this sleekness to it and I loved the touch screen, it was lightweight and I can go an entire day without having to plug in.”&nbsp;</p><p>Taking advantage of technology is number 10 on Entrepreneur magazine’s 23 common characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, and Reynolds says technology inspires her to look at things totally different.Reynolds’ visit to Dell focused, among other things, on an exciting part of Dell’s partnership with the successful businesswoman – supporting entrepreneurs.Reynolds has been a long-time advocate of women and minority owned entrepreneurs, most recently signing on as a judge on new TV series, Queen Boss.In addition to her work as the face of Dell for Small Business, Reynolds has been involved with Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network (DWEN) for many years and has participated in a number of events and activations in support of the mission of empowering women entrepreneurs.Pictured: Erik Day, VP Small Business Sales and Rakia Reynolds, CEO, Skai Blue Media&  Face of Dell for Small BusinessReynolds’ day at Dell yielded new opportunities for a continued partnership. She agreed to and subsequently spoke on a Small Business Panel powered by Microsoft and Dell that addressed government policies and how small businesses can grow and thrive under the new administration.When asked by the Young Entrepreneur Council’s “Business Collective” about the best advice she received that helped shape her as an entrepreneur, however, she said it was actually discouragement that drives her.“My mother once told me, ‘Rakia, you can’t be on every ship that sails!’ And while some people would agree with this ‘you can’t have it all’ sentiment, I’ve made it my mission to prove her wrong. I absolutely love my mother, but I want to be living proof that you can do everything you put your mind to,” she told them.Ultimately, however, success to Reynolds is running a company where she gets to have an impact on the world, and we’re excited to provide her the technology solutions she needs to do just that.last_img read more

Corky Lee, known for photographing Asian America, dies at 73

first_imgCorky Lee, a photojournalist who spent five decades spotlighting the often ignored Asian and Pacific Islander American communities, has died. He was 73. His family said in a statement that Lee died Wednesday in Queens, New York, of complications from COVID-19. The self-described “undisputed unofficial Asian American Photographer Laureate,” Lee used his eye to pursue what he saw as “photographic justice.” He was present at many seminal moments impacting Asian America over a 50-year career. He was also a founding member of the New York chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association. A private funeral service will be held in New York.last_img

Bosnian director: Movie’s human-rights focus resonates now

first_imgSARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnian filmmaker Jasmila Zbanic says she is used to improvising. And she says that came in handy this year while finishing a film during the pandemic. Zbanic’s latest film — “Quo Vadis, Aida?” — has no promotional budget but does have Oscar buzz as a possible nominee for best international film. Zbanic will know next week whether the movie made the shortlist of 15 international films. “Quo Vadis, Aida?” is based on true events from Bosnia’s 1992-95 inter-ethnic war. It took the writer-director more than a decade to put together and create. Post-production had to be done remotely across Europe. Zbanic thinks the movie’s focus on human rights resonates even more because of the pandemic.last_img

Myanmar, Russia pose early tests for Biden’s foreign policy

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — A military coup in Myanmar and a mass crackdown on dissidents in Russia are presenting early tests for the Biden administration as it tries to reestablish American primacy as a worldwide pro-democracy leader. President Joe Biden and his nascent foreign policy team have been confronted with two serious challenges in two parts of the world. The U.S. has invested decades of time, energy and money into promoting democracy in both Myanmar and Russia but now faces challenges in each that could affect the global balance of power. Yet, the tools at its disposal — sanctions — have proved unreliable in prompting change in the past.last_img

US ends deal with Arizona restricting Biden on immigration

first_imgPHOENIX (AP) — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has terminated an unusual agreement that Arizona’s top prosecutor signed with the agency in the waning days of the Trump administration that would restrict President Joe Biden’s ability to overhaul his predecessor’s immigration policies. The action was revealed Wednesday as Arizona’s Republican attorney general sued to stop the newly confirmed Homeland Security secretary from carrying out the Democratic president’s 100-day moratorium on deportations. A federal judge in Texas has already put it on hold. The action comes the same week a whistleblower compliant revealed a top DHS official under Trump reached last-minute agreements with a union for immigration employees.last_img

University invites candidates to campus

first_imgIf Notre Dame has its way, the road to the White House may take a pass through South Bend. Notre Dame announced Monday that University president Fr. John Jenkins and student body president Brett Rocheleau have extended invitations to President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney to speak on campus during the fall election campaign, according to a University press release. Continuing a 60-year University tradition, Jenkins and Rocheleau addressed letters to each candidate offering the University as a “forum for serious political discussion,” the press release stated. The invitations are also open to both of the candidates’ running mates, Vice President Joe Biden and Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.), according to the press release. The invitations are intended “to provide the campus community a firsthand impression of the contenders and their messages,” the release stated. University spokesman Dennis Brown said any appearances on campus would help continue the tradition of political discourse on campus. “Universities provide for the free exchange of ideas, and that’s especially important when it comes to electing our president,” he said. “We have a 60-year tradition of inviting candidates to Notre Dame every four years, and we’re hopeful that one or both campaigns will send either their presidential or vice presidential candidates to our campus.” Rocheleau, who also reached out to both campaigns earlier in the year via email, said he does not anticipate any timeline for a response. However, should any of the candidates accept, he said they will find a politically-balanced student body and an exceptional venue for political dialogue. “I think it would be interesting to have the candidates speak at Notre Dame because we are a place of intellectual curiosity,” he said. “We’re pretty evenly mixed [between political parties]. I think it would be an interesting opportunity to spark intellectual conversation and I’d love for them to come visit and speak.” Rocheleau said colleges and universities, especially a school like Notre Dame, offer a unique and important political avenue for the candidates to explore. “I think they can hear what students and younger voters are interested in, and the issues that we truly care about,” he said. “I think it would be beneficial for them to visit colleges, especially Notre Dame, where we can talk about some of the issues we really care about.” Notre Dame would benefit from a visit from any of the four candidates as well, Rocheleau said, as such an event would offer a means to spark important conversation. “I think it would, overall, go to fostering intellectual curiosity and intellectual conversation on campus,” he said. “I think having one or both of the candidates speak at Notre Dame would be a great opportunity for students, undergrads as well as graduates, to hear and to think about things that are social and political.” Notre Dame in particular has always been an academic institution heavily involved in the American political sphere, Rocheleau said. “[Look] back to [University President Emeritus] Fr. [Theodore] Hesburgh working for civil rights with Martin Luther King Jr., involvement with all the different presidents we have had in the past,” he said. “I think we have always had a tie to politics and the President of the United States.” Hesburgh started the tradition of inviting presidential and vice-presidential candidates to speak at Notre Dame during election years, according to the press release. He invited Dwight Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson in his first year as University president, and both accepted. According to the press release, other candidates who have accepted the invitation to speak at Notre Dame include Richard Nixon, Henry Cabot Lodge, Warren Miller (a graduate of the University), Edmund Muskie, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Joe Lieberman. Notre Dame already has one significant election season event on the calendar. On Oct. 17, the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center will host one of the three Indiana gubernatorial debates. Libertarian Rupert Boneham, Democrat John Gregg and Republican Mark Pence are expected to participate in the event.last_img read more

Second district House race heavily contested

first_imgAfter months of speeches, fundraisers, handshakes and kissed babies, voters in Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District will decide whether Democrat Brendan Mullen or Republican Jackie Walorski will represent them on Capitol Hill. Notre Dame professor and former political reporter Jack Colwell said the race is still close with only four days remaining until Election Day. “At the start of the race, it was generally regarded as Jackie’s district,” Colwell said. “She unsuccessfully ran against [Sen.] Joe Donnelly in 2010, but came close. She also has a lot of name recognition, where Mullen is virtually unknown.” Colwell said the Republican-controlled state legislature redrew voting district lines in a way likely to incorporate more right-leaning voters in the district, favoring Walorski’s odds. “She began as a very heavy favorite, but Mullen came on in an impressive way,” Colwell said. “Whether he can actually catch up and win is far from certain, but he’s made a race of it that’s shown by some of the national groups spending heavily in this district now. Neither side would spend if they figured the race was over.” With voters looking for more bipartisanship, both candidates stress their willingness to reach across the aisle in Washington, Colwell said. “Jackie is saying she would be an independent voice and Mullen says he’d be a moderate, along the lines of Joe Donnelly, the Democrat who represents the district now,” he said. The spending includes funds from political consultant Karl Rove’s Super PAC, American Crossroads, which is backing Walorski. Mullen is getting support from Democratic PACs and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Name recognition has been difficult for Mullen in these new areas. To draw enough votes, Colwell said Mullen must win big in St. Joseph County, the most populous county of the 10 in the district, because his chances in the other nine are not good. Part of the headwinds Mullen will face throughout the district, Colwell said, comes from his opponent’s associating him with controversial figures and policies in Washington. “Walorski is trying to portray him as a Washington insider who was recruited by [House of Representatives minority leader] Nancy Pelosi to try and run in the district, and links him to President Obama and Obamacare,” Colwell said. “Mullen tries to link her to the Tea Party, which indeed did support her; Richard Mourdock, the Indiana Republican senatorial candidate who recently made controversial comments about abortion; and calls her a career politician.” The two candidates’ first and only television debate together occurred Tuesday at WSBT studios in Mishawaka. Mullen and Walorski also held a radio debate in Wabash, Ind., on Oct. 25. Colwell said Mullen came across as more assertive than Walorski in the debates because of the “prevent defense” Walorski has adopted to preserver her favorable poll numbers. “Mullen tried to get in all of his points and was critical of Walorski on the privatization of social security,” Colwell said. “Walorski seemed more intent on not making a mistake to preserve what’s assumed to be her lead.” Colwell attributed some of the contention in the race to the district’s residents’ moderate political leanings. “Both parties in seeking control of the House will zero in on this district as one that could be won,” Colwell said. “There are a lot of congressional districts across the country where it’s obvious that one party will win, but if it’s close, both sides will come in spending millions of dollars to make television stations happy.”last_img read more

Irish celebrate Mardi Gras on location

first_imgThis Fat Tuesday, some Notre Dame students will be celebrating with authentic Mardi Gras spirit straight from the Big Easy. “It’s definitely an experience coming down, even with a budget,” senior Justin Asuncion said about his trip to New Orleans this past weekend. “It’s a great experience that every Notre Dame student should take if you can.” Asuncion and fellow seniors Andrew Charnesky and Joe Caparros drove through the night Thursday to arrive in New Orleans by Friday morning, where they experienced traditions ranging from parades to Southern cookouts, they said.  “We had the opportunity to go to an authentic crawfish boil,” Charnesky said. “We’re not from the South; we’d never heard of a crawfish boil before, but it was some of the best food I’ve ever had.” Senior Allison Tompkins also traveled to New Orleans for the first time and agreed that the cuisine stood out as a highlight of her trip. “I had grits for the first time, cheese grits with shrimp on it,” Tompkins said. “The rice and beans was to die for… I didn’t taste anything that wasn’t good.” Tompkins described touring the French Quarter and learning about the history of various parades and the groups, called krewes, which plan them. “I had heard about the pretty buildings, you know, in the French Quarter and everything, but honestly I didn’t know what to expect,” Tompkins said. “It really shocked me how beautiful it was with all the different areas and the Mississippi River and everything.” Notre Dame Food Services general manager Marc Poklinkowski said students staying at Notre Dame for the festivities will be able to experience themed décor and menu items at both dining halls on Tuesday. “South will have our Cajun-themed dishes on both homestyle and Pan-Am,” Poklinkowski said. “The popularity of this meal has increased tremendously over the years, so we found the need to take the regular Pan-Am items off for this day to offer students another area to get the themed menu items they are looking for.” Poklinkowski added North Dining Hall will be offering jambalaya and Mississippi fried catfish as well as chocolate rum cake and mini éclairs and that South Dining Hall will feature jambalaya as well with blackened catfish. “Our dessert bar [at South] will be a make-your-own-dessert featuring pound cakes, fresh strawberries, apples and caramel sauce, hot chocolate fudge and whipped topping,” Poklinkowski said. Although Mardi Gras known for its celebration of excess, Asuncion and Charnesky said traveling to New Orleans can be done even on a tight budget. Charnesky noted that driving and staying with a friend in New Orleans helped cut expenses. “You can definitely do it for under $500,” Charnesky said. “It’s not cheap, but if you’re just conscious about stuff you can do it on a budget. “It’s a great time and it’s going to be something you’ll always remember.” Contact Lesley Stevenson at lsteven1@nd.edulast_img read more

Saint Mary’s announces new physics major

first_imgTags: dual-degree program, Physics, Saint Mary’s College, STEM The Saint Mary’s department of chemistry and physics will offer majors in the field of physics in addition to the existing chemistry major.Ian Bentley, associate professor of chemistry and physics, said there was a fair amount of student interest in having physics as a major.“Everyone that I would talk to about it knew of a student that was interested,” he said. “You add those all up and see that it’s quite a few students who have been interested in physics, not just one.”According to Bentley, the department discussed the potential of creating a physics major, especially to support the students in the engineering dual degree program with Notre Dame. The program allows Saint Mary’s students to graduate with a degree from Saint Mary’s before transferring to Notre Dame for a fifth year to earn their engineering degree.Chris Dunlap, chair of chemistry and physics at the College, said when Bentley was hired in the fall of 2014, there was no physics major or minor. However, in order to best address the needs of students — particularly those in the dual degree program — the department chose to create a major program instead of just a minor.“A minor was not going to match the needs,” Dunlap said. “Between engineers who wanted a more applied approach to the mathematics and a group of students who were really interested in physics, we at the department decided we would move forward with the major.”Bentley said the department will offer two different degrees with three possible majors as well as a minor. There will be a physics Bachelor of Arts degree, a physics Bachelor of Science degree and a physics and applied mathematics (PAM) Bachelor of Arts degree, Bentley said. The two PAM degrees are offered through the math department while the BS and BA in physics will be through the department of chemistry and physics.Bentley said the Bachelor of Arts degree requires between 34 and 38 credit hours, the Bachelor of Science requires 60 credit hours, and the PAM degree required between 49 and 53 hours. The minor requires between 17 and 18 credit hours.Dunlap said the construction on the science hall was intended to renovate some labs and also to accommodate the new major.“The basement [of the science hall] is all physics space,” Dunlap said. “We have the same amount of space dedicated for physics as before, but now it’s its own floor.”Bentley said there are currently two students declared as PAM majors and one student as a physics major, all three of which are in the dual-degree program. He said there are also about three to four first years who have physics as an intended major.Adding this major may increase enrollment, Dunlap said, specifically in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.“What we’ve done is we’ve filled in a hole in the STEM fields that Saint Mary’s has had forever,” Dunlap said. “We’ve never had a physics major at Saint Mary’s … This is a very exciting time for the STEM departments because it gives us another option for our students to pursue.“We never really knew how many students might have come to Saint Mary’s if this were available because we’ve never had it,” Dunlap said. “We’re really interested to find out now how many students are out there who might be now attracted to physics at a women’s college.”Bentley said this will help students in the duel degree program because it will offer a wider range of applicable majors and will open doors for students to enter the mechanical and electrical engineering fields.“I think it makes it feasible for students who are interested in applying mathematics,” Bentley said. “I think we’re hitting that niche that, to some extent, we missed before. If you’re thinking about mechanical engineering or electrical engineering, the most feasible route was to major in math. Now we have [physics] which is more applied.”Sophomore physics and mechanical engineering major Erin Patterson said she was deciding between majoring in chemistry or in mathematics when she first heard about the physics major and realized that it worked better for the dual-degree program.“I wanted to apply math not just write proofs and definitions,” Patterson said. “I considered the different types of engineering that paired best with these majors. After talking with Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s professors and Saint Mary’s students, I found I shared some of the same interests and disinterests with mechanical engineers, and I knew physics paired well with mechanical engineering.”Rachel Bonek, a sophomore PAM and electrical engineering major, said she originally planned to be a math and engineering major, but with the new PAM major, it made more sense for her degree.“I am excited that another science major is offered at Saint Mary’s,” Bonek said. “I think it’s important to continue to increase the number of women in math and science, and having the physics major here will definitely help.”last_img read more