Militants strike ahead of Modi visit

first_imgJust a day ahead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Kashmir, militants on Saturday attacked an Army convoy here, injuring three soldiers.The attack took place around 1 p.m. on the busy Srinagar-Baramulla National Highway as the convoy was heading to the capital. “The militants opened fire on the convoy at Bemina. Three soldiers were injured. They were shifted to the Army’s base hospital and are undergoing treatment,” the Srinagar-based Army spokesman, Colonel Rajesh Kalia, told The Hindu.Army retaliatesThe Army fired in retaliation, but failed to nab the militants. The area where the attack took place houses the busy Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital.The militants escaped as the people started running for cover. A high alert has been issued. During his visit, Mr. Modi will inaugurate the 9.2-km Nashri-Chenani tunnel, which connects Udhampur and Ramban districts. Separatists have called for a shutdown in the Valley.Earlier in the day, panic gripped Srinagar’s Lal Chowk after rumours about a militant attack. Scores of tear smoke shells were fired on a 2- km stretch to control the situation.Panic spread after gunshots were heard near Taj Hotel in Lal Chowk. Police sources said a masked man was spotted in the area and was mistaken for a fidayeen attacker. However, no militant was arrested as the police raided the area. The crackdown was followed by stone throwing by the local people. A shutdown soon ensued. No one was grievously injured in the clashes.last_img read more

Another bridge opened to boost connectivity to China border

first_imgWorking towards improving road connectivity to areas close to the Line of Actual Control (LAC) with China in Ladakh region, the Border Roads Organisation (BRO) today opened a newly-constructed bridge to the people of the cold desert region in Jammu and Kashmir.“Continuing its development work in the strategic Ladakh region, Project Himank of the BRO on Sunday dedicated another bridge to the people of the cold desert, the third such bridge in a month, for efficient connectivity to the China border,” a spokesman of the BRO said. The chief engineer of Project Himank, Brigadier D.M Purvimath, inaugurated the 30-metre heavy bridge over the Linche river on Leh-Loma road. Appreciating the engineers and workers of the organisation, Brig. Purvimath said Project Himank would accomplish development of Leh by providing modern bridges and roads to enhance connectivity. He emphasised the need to expedite completion of all bridges falling on all the strategically-important road communications on the Indo-China axis. Brig. Purvimath said this bridge on the Leh-Loma road would enhance travel of locals as well as the Army in this strategic region.“Such connectivity shall enhance travel and communication for strategic transport and tourism development.” He said that all bailey bridges were being replaced by modern heavy permanent bridges in the sector of Project Himank. The Leh-Loma road is the main connectivity to various link roads along the Line of Actual Control and is being developed to National Highway Double Lane (NHDL) specification owing to its strategic and operational importance as it is the closest route to China border, the spokesman said.last_img read more

Bishnois protest against chinkara poaching in Rajasthan

first_imgAmid reports that the demand for meat has fuelled poaching of endangered chinkaras in the Bikaner and Shekhawati regions, a large number of wildlife lovers and members of the Bishnoi community staged a demonstration outside Aranya Bhavan, headquarters of the Forest Department, here on Wednesday.Endangered statusThe poaching has been going on despite the chinkara enjoying the status of an endangered animal with the highest protection under Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972. The Bishnoi sect, which protects animals and trees as part of its religious beliefs, zealously guards chinkaras in the Marwar region where it lives in majority.The protesters raised slogans and submitted a memorandum, addressed to Chief Wildlife Warden G.V. Reddy, asking why the Forest Department was silent on the hunting of gazelles, even though the poaching was being reported with regularity. The areas where Bishnois do not reside have witnessed a sharp increase in these instances.All India Bishnoi Mahasabha executive member Ram Niwas Bishnoi said seven chinkara carcasses were recovered recently in the Shekhawati region with the poachers revealing that they sell the gazelle meat for ₹150 per kg or ₹.2,000 for the complete animal body. “These claims should be verified through an impartial investigation and hunters arrested without delay,” he said.Representatives of the Tourism and Wildlife Society of India and Bishnoi Tiger Force, who also joined the demonstration, said they were baffled by the Rajasthan government’s silence when the endangered animals which gave a unique identity to the State were being hunted.Demand for meatThe chinkaras are being poached allegedly by the Bawaria community, a Scheduled Caste whose traditional occupation is hunting, at the behest of wealthy local people fond of meat. The instances of poaching go up during winters when there is an inflow of tourists in the desert State.“The hunters don’t dare to come to the areas near Jodhpur where there is a big population of Bishnois. They know we will catch them…They take advantage of lack of awareness among the people in other regions and neglect of the government authorities,” said Mr. Bishnoi.last_img read more

Rapists of minors to be given death penalty in Haryana

first_imgThe Haryana government on Tuesday decided to make more stringent existing criminal laws related to sexual offences against women and children. The Cabinet meeting, chaired by Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Tuesday, decided to make amendments to Sections 376A, 376D, 354 and 354 D(2) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).“In case of rape or gang rape of a girl below 12 years of age, there will be a punishment of death or rigorous imprisonment of not less than 14 years which may extend to imprisonment for life — that is for remainder period of person’s natural life,” said an official statement.According to the section introduced under 376AA of the IPC, whoever commits rape on a girl up to 12 years of age will be punished with death or rigorous imprisonment for a term which will not be less than 14 years, but which may extend to imprisonment for the remainder of that person’s natural life and will also be liable to fine.Common intentionAnother provision made under Section 376D A of IPC, where a girl up to 12 years of age is raped by one or more persons constituting a group or acting in furtherance of a common intention, each of those persons shall be deemed to have committed the offence of rape and will be punished with death or rigorous imprisonment for a term which will not be less than 20 years, but which may extend to life which will mean imprisonment for the remainder of that person’s natural life, and with fine.Such a fine shall be just and reasonable to meet the medical expenses and rehabilitation of the victim. Any fine imposed under this section will be paid to the victim, said the statement. Apart from this, the Cabinet decided that under Section 354 of the IPC, whoever assaults or uses criminal force on a woman, intending to outrage or knowing it to be likely that he will thereby outrage her modesty, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which will not be less than two years but may extend up to seven years and shall also liable to fine.Tough on stalkingBesides, under section 354D (2) of the IPC, whoever commits the offence or stalking will be punished on first conviction with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to three years and shall also liable to fine; and be punished on a second or subsequent conviction, with imprisonment of either description for a term which will not be less than three years, but may extend to seven years and will also be liable to fine, the Cabinet decided.last_img read more

Seven Maoists involved in Sukma IED blast arrested

first_imgSeven Maoists were arrested in Chhattisgarh’s Sukma district on Sunday in connection with the Improvised Explosive Device blast targetting an anti-landmine vehicle of the CRPF earlier this month that left nine troopers dead, a senior police officer said.According to Deputy Inspector General of Police, Bastar, P. Sundarrajan, the insurgents were arrested in an operation launched by the STF, CRPF and the Cobra Battalion on Saturday.The accused were identified as Komram Sade, Madkam Joga, Madkam Hindwa, Mandvi Sukka, Madkam Ganga, Vanjam Aayta and Vanjam Singha, all members of the ‘Jan Militia’ and residents of Kistram in Sukma, he said. Mr. Sundarrajan said that they were convinced the seven Maoists were responsible for the March 13 blast in the Pallodi area of Kistram. Four jawans injuredFour District Reserve Guard jawans were injured in an IED blast, suspected to be carried out by the Naxals, in a forest near Sirsetti village in Chhattisgarh’s Sukma district today, the police said.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

Policeman killed in south Kashmir

first_imgOne Special Police Officer (SPO) was killed, and his wife and a civilian injured in two separate incidents of firing in south Kashmir on Thursday evening. Militants also attacked an Army patrol in another incident. Preliminary reports suggest that gunmen barged into the house of SPO Mushtaq Ahmad Sheikh, a resident of Anantnag’s Bijbehara area in the evening. A police official said Mr. Sheikh died of bullet injuries and his wife suffered injuries in the attack. “She is stable now,” said the police.In a separate incident, unknown gunmen fired upon civilian Sayer Ahmad Wani of Kulgam’s Chancer area. Mr. Wani is a teacher in a local madrasa. The police said it were investigating the matter.Earlier, militants ambushed an Army patrol of 4 Rashtriya Rifles in Shopian. The ambush led to a brief exchange of fire between. The area was cordoned off. However, the militants managed to flee from the spot, said the police.last_img read more

IS victims’ remains handed over to kin

first_imgIndia on Monday brought back the mortal remains of the men, working at a construction site in Iraq, who were kidnapped by fighters of the Islamic State in 2014.The physical remains of 38 men, packed in wooden coffins, were transported on a C17 aircraft from Baghdad, under the supervision of Minister of State for External Affairs General (retired) V.K. Singh.First stopAddressing a press conference at the cargo terminal of the Sri Guru Ram Dass Jee International Airport here, the first stop of the mission to return the remains of the men to their families, the Minister said a total of 38 victims were identified and released by the Martyrs Foundation of Iraq.Tough taskThe Foundation has carried out the difficult task of exhumation and identification of the bodies from a mud mound on the outskirts of Mosul.Also Read All hopes dashed and full of tears  In a statement made in the Rajya Sabha on March 20, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj announced that the men were killed by militants of the Islamic State.Remains of the 39th victim, Raju Yadav of Bihar, however, was not sent back as the process of matching his DNA was not yet complete, Mr. Singh said.“It is a moment of grief for the nation as we have returned with the mortal remains of the loved ones. Iraq continues to be a in a difficult condition. But we are thankful to the Martyrs Foundation which has worked day and night to identify the remains with the help of DNA matching. IED explosions are still common in Mosul, yet they have accomplished the process,” said Mr. Singh in his remarks at the airport.“It was an arduous process and we took help of the local people and broadcast appeals in local TV and FM channels about the Indians who were missing. Finally someone informed us about the location in Badush where the remains were located with the help of ground-penetrating radar,” Mr Singh said..Out of the 38 men, 27 were from Punjab, four from Himachal Pradesh, five from Bihar and two from West Bengal. Four ambulances carrying the remains of the men from Himachal Pradesh left by road soon after the C17 aircraft landed. The rest of the coffins will be sent to Patna and Kolkata respectively. The airport witnessed heart-rending scenes as family members broke down on receiving the coffins. Government officials from Punjab and in most instances MPs of various parties accompanied the ambulances that carried the coffins to their respective final destinations.last_img read more

MP electoral roll: Over 6.7 lakh ineligible voters found

first_imgOver 6.7 lakh ineligible voters were identified during the verification of the electoral roll in Madhya Pradesh in a special campaign from March 15 to April 7, the State’s chief electoral officer Salina Singh said.Ms. Singh said those identified included voters who are dead, or have been registered at two places, have migrated or were not found (absent) during the campaign.“The voter list is being updated. On the basis of information received from the district collectors, a total of 6,73,884 ineligible names were found during this campaign,” she said in a press release.Ms. Singh said that the district collectors have been told to follow due process, including issuing notices, before striking off the names deemed ineligible.“In the summary revision till December 15 last year, the names of 3,83,203 ineligible voters were removed from the rolls. Of these, 3,512 were found absent, another 1,92,444 had migrated, 1,68,227 had died and 19,020 were double entries,” she informed. The number of eligible voters in the state, post this exercise, she said, stood at 5.07-crore as on January, 2018.last_img read more

BJP leader threatens Kashmiri journalists, draws flak

first_imgSenior BJP leader Chaudhary Lal Singh on Saturday evoked sharp reactions from journalist groups and political parties for his remarks warning Kashmir-based journalists to “mend ways” over the reporting of the Kathua rape and murder, while referring to the assassination of Rising Kashmir Editor Shujaat Bukhari.“Kashmiri journalists should draw a line on the journalism they do. Do they have to face [something] like what happened to Basharat [referring to Shujaat Bukhari], so that such a situation emerges. So mend your ways and draw a line, so that this brotherhood remains intact and there is progress,” Mr. Singh said in an interview on Friday.Mr. Singh was dropped from the Mehbooba Mufti Cabinet earlier this year for his rally and speech made in Kathua to those who supporting the accused in the rape and murder case of an eight-year-old in Kathua. His younger brother also faced an FIR for using “foul language against Ms. Mufti in a public rally”.Several political parties and journalists’ bodies sought action against the BJP leader for the “threatening” remarks.“Journalists in Kashmir just got threatened by a MLA. It seems Shujaat’s death is now a tool for goons to use to threaten other journalists,” said National Conference vice-president and former Chief Minister Omar Abdullah.Call for arrestNC spokesman Junaid Mattoo asked the police to lodge an FIR against the BJP leader.The Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), a former ally of the BJP, urged Governor N.N. Vohra “to immediately book and arrest Mr. Singh for his derogatory remarks”.“Keeping in view Mr. Singh’s continuous rants against the people of Kashmir and trying to stoke the communal passions in the State, it is highly unfortunate that elements like him are allowed to roam freely,” said PDP general secretary Mansoor Hussain Sohrawardy.Meanwhile, the Kashmir Editors Guild (KEG), a body of Valley-based editors, termed the remarks “criminal”. “The KEG reserves the right to lodge a police case against the lawmaker who, earlier as well, named a number of reporters for his fall from grace in wake of the Kathua probe, now in a trial stage. The Congress-turned-BJP politician has seemingly talked on Kashmir media from a point of strength and possible information about the recent killing in Srinagar,” said the KEG statement.The Kashmir Working Journalists Association and the J&K Press Association, also condemned Mr. Singh’s remarks.“The bullying statement made against Kashmiri journalists is unwarranted and condemnable,” the KWJA spokesman said.last_img read more

BJP seeks Z-category security for Biplab Deb

first_imgThe BJP in Tripura will write to the Union Home Ministry seeking more security for Chief Minister Biplab Kumar Deb, who, the party says, is facing a threat to his life from drug cartels because of his drive against opium and cannabis growers.On Thursday, BJP MLA Ratan Chakraborty said the Centre was aware of the need to tighten Mr. Deb’s security, following a report that drug lords in Myanmar had hatched a plot to kill him. Myanmar is a major producer of narcotic drugs.“We are drafting a note for the MHA, requesting that the Chief Minister’s security be enhanced to the Z category from the current Y category… We have also asked party workers to be on their toes as the Chief Minister often breaks security cordon to meet people,” Mr. Chakraborty said.After its formation in March, the BJP-led coalition declared war on drugs. The police and other security agencies have so far seized more than 50,000 kg of cannabis and destroyed plants on large areas across the State. Police officers say the drug corridor from Myanmar to Bangladesh, through Tripura, has been choked, with drug lords in Myanmar turning restive.last_img read more

Modi ‘anguished’ at Congress ‘abusing’ Northeast culture, calling its dress ‘outlandish’

first_img Mr. Modi asserted that in the last four years, the BJP government at the Centre, had worked for greater recognition of Indian culture and traditions, far and wide.  “Through its ‘Act, East, Act Fast’ policy, the BJP has, in the last 4.5 years, developed every region of the Northeast.”The double engine of the BJP governments in both the Centre and the State would take Mizoram to new heights, he added.Mizoram is the last bastion of the Congress in the Northeast. Elections to the 40-member Assembly is scheduled for November 28. No substance in what Modi speaks, says Rahul Gandhi Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday said he felt a deep sense of anguish at the Congress “abusing” the Northeast culture and calling its dress “outlandish.”“I feel a deep sense of anguish when I see a Congress leader abusing the traditional dress of the Northeast States, calling them outlandish. Your hopes and ambitions do not matter to the Congress. Their priority is power and not the people of Mizoram,” he said at an election rally at Lunglei in Mizoram.Tharoor’s remarksIn August last, Congress leader Shashi Tharoor stated that the Prime Minister wears “outlandish” headgear. “I ask you why does our Prime Minister wear all sorts of outlandish headgear wherever he goes around the country or around the world? Why does he always refuse to wear a Muslim skull cap?” he said.Mr. Modi said the country had understood the “divide and rule” policy of the Congress and that was the reason the party was just confined to a few States.“The Congress party, which once governed maximum number of States, is now restricted to just two or three States. Now, the people of Mizoram have a golden opportunity to rid themselves of this Congress culture. The Congress’s priority is not the people of Mizoram; it is fighting to gain power,” he said.Also Readlast_img read more

NGT asks Chandigarh to formulate action plan

first_imgThe National Green Tribunal (NGT) has asked the Union Territory of Chandigarh to develop a Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP) in a bid to control air pollution.Following submissions made by the Advisor to Chandigarh, a Bench headed by NGT Chairperson Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel said, “We have been informed that air pollution is a serious cause of concern in Chandigarh due to excessive number of vehicles on the roads resulting in high emission level. If it is so, remedial measures have to be planned and executed.”Number of vehicles“Steps be taken to assess the number of vehicles to be permitted proportionate to the capacity of the area. Based on such study and analysis, an appropriate policy framework be worked out,” the Bench added.Based on reports provided to the tribunal pertaining to solid waste management, the Bench directed authorities to take steps towards compliance of the Solid Waste Management rules within six weeks. Stating that steps taken towards plastic waste management and bio-medical waste management are “inadequate,” the NGT directed authorities to comply with relevant bio-medical and plastic waste management rules.Waste treatment“Efforts should be made to ensure treatment and processing of bio-degradable and non-biodegradable waste for which the existing plant should be put into operation by resolving the issues. The legacy waste dump sites should not be simply capped but should be bio-mined and then kept and maintained in accordance to (relevant rules),” the Bench added.Quarterly reportsWhile the Advisor has been asked to provide quarterly reports to the tribunal, he has to be present before the green panel in October with relevant compliance reports.last_img read more

Designer Microbes Expand Life’s Genetic Alphabet

first_imgFrom bacteria to basketball players, all life as we know it encodes genetic information using two pairs of DNA letters. Not anymore. Now, along with the double helix’s two natural pairs—A bound to T and G bound to C—a bacterium growing in a California lab can incorporate and copy a third, artificial pair of letters. For now, the artificial bases—call them X and Y—don’t code for anything, unlike natural DNA base pairs, which in various combinations code for the 20 different amino acids that make up proteins. But the newly expanded genetic code opens the door for synthetic biologists to create microbes capable of building their proteins out of as many as 172 different amino acids, both natural and artificial—a potential boon to drug and materials developers.“This is an amazing enabling technology,” says Ross Thyer, a molecular biologist at the University of Texas, Austin, who was not involved in the work, reported in this week’s issue of Nature. Not only does the feat open the way to a universe of new proteins, but it also gives researchers a new platform for investigating how DNA evolved and why all life is limited to just five bases. (In RNA, T is replaced with U.)Creating synthetic superbacteria might sound ominous. But Eric Kool, a biological chemist at Stanford University in California, says the risks are low. “These organisms cannot survive outside the laboratory,” Kool says. In fact, they can’t even build X and Y (more formally known as d5SICS and dNaM) themselves: Researchers synthesize the bases and feed them to the bacteria. “Personally, I think it’s a less dangerous way to modify DNA” than existing genetic engineering, Kool says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Over the decades, synthetic biologists trying to expand life’s genetic alphabet have come up with a handful of alternative genetic letters. A few teams, including one led by Floyd Romesberg, a biological chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California, have even managed to get DNA replication proteins called DNA polymerases to copy DNA strands incorporating alternative letters. But that was achieved in test tubes, not inside living cells.Getting live bacteria to replicate altered DNA was another challenge entirely. The bacteria would need either to synthesize the new genetic letters themselves or to import them from the surrounding culture medium. In algae, Romesberg and his colleagues identified a protein that grabs nucleotide bases and pulls them into the cell. They spliced the gene for this transporter protein into Escherichia coli bacteria and found it enabled the bacteria to pull in presynthesized X and Y bases as well. The team had also engineered their E. coli to harbor small rings of DNA called plasmids carrying X-Y pairs. When the bacteria copied those plasmids, they used the newly imported X and Y bases—yet the engineered cells grew just as well as their native cousins.Next, Romesberg says he hopes to use his expanded genetic alphabet to create designer proteins. Scripps biochemist Peter Schultz and others have already engineered bacteria to build proteins with dozens of amino acids beyond nature’s standard 20. But those experiments use natural DNA to code for unnatural amino acids. The newly expanded genetic alphabet, Thyer says, should yield a vastly more diverse menu of proteins with a wide variety of new chemical functions, such as medicines better able to survive in the body and protein-based materials that assemble themselves. Romesberg says forays into that new world of proteins are already under way.last_img read more

Announcing … The 2014 Dance Your Ph.D. Contest

first_imgThe dreaded question. “So, what’s your Ph.D. research about?” You take a deep breath and launch into the explanation. People’s eyes begin to glaze over …At times like these, don’t you wish you could just turn to the nearest computer and show people a video of your Ph.D. thesis interpreted in dance form?Now you can! And while you’re at it, you can win $1000 and a free trip to California, achieve immortal geek fame on the Internet, and be recognized by Science for your effort.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)This is the 7th year of the contest sponsored by AAAS and Science, which challenges you to explain your Ph.D. research without PowerPoint or jargon—in fact with no talking at all. It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting your Ph.D. or you completed it decades ago.It’s not as hard as it sounds. Take a look at the Ph.D. dance of Cedric Tan, who created a dance video based on his University of Oxford Ph.D. thesis about sperm competition:As in previous years, this is a dance-off between the major branches of science (very loosely defined): physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences. The winner of each branch gets $500. If your Ph.D. is the best overall, you get an additional $500 and a free trip to Stanford University in spring 2015 (travel and hotel covered by HighWire Press) to screen your Ph.D. dance.The deadline for submission is 29 September 2014.To enter the contest, follow the instructions here.Good luck, scientists. We look forward to seeing you move!last_img read more

Indian-origin doctor accused of reusing one-use anal catheters on patients

first_imgA New Jersey surgeon’s medical license has been temporarily suspended for allegedly reusing disposable anal catheters on multiple patients.Attorney general Christopher Porrino says East Brunswick-based colon and rectal surgeon Sanjiv Patankar allegedly washed and reused the one-use catheters that are inserted into patients during medical procedures.State officials say they have evidence that Patankar ordered only five catheters during time when he performed 82 procedures requiring them.The state Board of Medical Examiners unanimously voted to suspend the doctor’s license last week, saying he “placed patients in clear and imminent danger.”Read it at Hindustan TImes Related Itemslast_img

Punjabis’ US Study Plans Hit a Pause

first_imgKulwinder Singh from Ludhiana faces the dilemma of whether to send his daughter to the US for higher education or not. Considering her strong academic credentials, Singh is sure of her placement in Ivy League US universities. His worry is whether her academic student visa (F-1) would lead to a work visa (H1-B) later, as used to be the normal practice so far.Read it at Times of India Related Itemslast_img

The Trouble With Meteors

first_imgThe economy is booming with GDP growth topping 8 percent. Its stock market recently scaled 11,000, galloping 17 percent so far this year, after gaining 42 percent last year. Bullish foreign investors poured $11 billion into Indian stock in 2005 and the country, which once ran a foreign exchange deficit, now boasts $144 billion in reserves. Things are looking so good that the government is proposing easing convertibility of the long-sheltered Indian rupee.India is being clubbed with China as the new emerging economy, which has not gone unnoticed in the land of the dragon. Last month almost 200 Chinese corporate executives, led by the Commerce Minister Bo Xilai, descended upon Mumbai to explore business opportunities in the country. “We believe the economic potential of India will continue to grow,” Xilai said. “That’s why Chinese businesses are paying attention.”India’s flourishing economy even lured domestically shell-shocked U.S. President George W Bush to travel to India in early March and the highly favorable nuclear agreement that India struck with the United States was made possible in no small part by the Bush administration’s eagerness to tap into the country’s robust economic growth.It’s truly astonishing how in less than one decade the image of India in the global psyche has transformed from a malignant nation of poverty and misery to an economic and high tech powerhouse. The economic boom, jumpstarted by the technology sector and to some degree by Indian technology workers in the United States, has cascaded far beyond that sector. A visit to the new India can be jolting to Indian immigrants who have not been home for a few years. The construction boom, the easy availability of the latest consumer gadgets, as well as the money to lap them up, is nothing short of extraordinary. We are even witnessing a reverse migration of many Indian immigrants and Western expatriates to India, all salivating over the prospects of business killings to be made in the country.India’s meteoric rise and the constant media drumbeat can be so tantalizing as to blind one to the precarious ground on which this success rests. The country’s infrastructure, even in the hot spots of Bangalore, Hyderabad and New Delhi is abysmal and groaning under the strain. Wired magazine noted recently, “Modern India is a morass of corruption and poverty — and awash in email and cell phones.” The country was ranked 92 with a score of 2.8 out of a possible 10 on Transparency International’s 2005 Corruption Perception Index. Fully a fifth of all Indians live in abject poverty without adequate access to food or shelter. That is an astonishing 200 million people. The country’s law enforcement and judicial system is notoriously corrupt and inefficient.Corporate India is also beginning to sound an alarm on the engine behind India’s spectacular rise — its hierarchical, rote-rewarding, innovation-repressing, risk-averse educational system that churns out hundreds of thousands of drones annually to service the call centers and back room operations of the thriving BPO (business process outsourcing) sector. At February’s annual convention of India’s software trade association, Nasscom, several business leaders, including Azim Premji, chairman of Wipro, bemoaned the singular lack of innovative spark in Indian professionals and the country’s educational system. “We are becoming a nation of aspiring programmers and sales people,” lamented Jerry Rao, CEO of MphasiS.Even as we celebrate India’s meteoric rise, we need also to begin tackling its fundamental problems of poverty, infrastructure development and educational reform if the country is to maintain its continuing edge in the decade ahead. Otherwise we may well learn an enduring cosmic lesson — the trouble with meteors is that they burn out fast. Related Itemslast_img read more