Corky Lee, known for photographing Asian America, dies at 73

first_imgCorky Lee, a photojournalist who spent five decades spotlighting the often ignored Asian and Pacific Islander American communities, has died. He was 73. His family said in a statement that Lee died Wednesday in Queens, New York, of complications from COVID-19. The self-described “undisputed unofficial Asian American Photographer Laureate,” Lee used his eye to pursue what he saw as “photographic justice.” He was present at many seminal moments impacting Asian America over a 50-year career. He was also a founding member of the New York chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association. A private funeral service will be held in New York.last_img

Bosnian director: Movie’s human-rights focus resonates now

first_imgSARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnian filmmaker Jasmila Zbanic says she is used to improvising. And she says that came in handy this year while finishing a film during the pandemic. Zbanic’s latest film — “Quo Vadis, Aida?” — has no promotional budget but does have Oscar buzz as a possible nominee for best international film. Zbanic will know next week whether the movie made the shortlist of 15 international films. “Quo Vadis, Aida?” is based on true events from Bosnia’s 1992-95 inter-ethnic war. It took the writer-director more than a decade to put together and create. Post-production had to be done remotely across Europe. Zbanic thinks the movie’s focus on human rights resonates even more because of the pandemic.last_img

Myanmar, Russia pose early tests for Biden’s foreign policy

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — A military coup in Myanmar and a mass crackdown on dissidents in Russia are presenting early tests for the Biden administration as it tries to reestablish American primacy as a worldwide pro-democracy leader. President Joe Biden and his nascent foreign policy team have been confronted with two serious challenges in two parts of the world. The U.S. has invested decades of time, energy and money into promoting democracy in both Myanmar and Russia but now faces challenges in each that could affect the global balance of power. Yet, the tools at its disposal — sanctions — have proved unreliable in prompting change in the past.last_img

US ends deal with Arizona restricting Biden on immigration

first_imgPHOENIX (AP) — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has terminated an unusual agreement that Arizona’s top prosecutor signed with the agency in the waning days of the Trump administration that would restrict President Joe Biden’s ability to overhaul his predecessor’s immigration policies. The action was revealed Wednesday as Arizona’s Republican attorney general sued to stop the newly confirmed Homeland Security secretary from carrying out the Democratic president’s 100-day moratorium on deportations. A federal judge in Texas has already put it on hold. The action comes the same week a whistleblower compliant revealed a top DHS official under Trump reached last-minute agreements with a union for immigration employees.last_img