Bosnian director: Movie’s human-rights focus resonates now

first_imgSARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnian filmmaker Jasmila Zbanic says she is used to improvising. And she says that came in handy this year while finishing a film during the pandemic. Zbanic’s latest film — “Quo Vadis, Aida?” — has no promotional budget but does have Oscar buzz as a possible nominee for best international film. Zbanic will know next week whether the movie made the shortlist of 15 international films. “Quo Vadis, Aida?” is based on true events from Bosnia’s 1992-95 inter-ethnic war. It took the writer-director more than a decade to put together and create. Post-production had to be done remotely across Europe. Zbanic thinks the movie’s focus on human rights resonates even more because of the pandemic.last_img

Research Funding

first_imgResearchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences broke records in fiscal year 2016 with $69 million in external funding to fuel college projects. From research plots across Georgia to state-of-the-art laboratories in Athens, Tifton and Griffin, CAES faculty members use this funding for research to support Georgia’s $74.3 billion agricultural industry and improve the food security and health of people around the world. Five university research teams – including one team led by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences horticulture Professor Esther van der Knaap, a recent Presidential hire – received a total of more than $14 million to explore the growth, development and behavior of a variety of plants, including tomatoes, sunflowers, maize, legumes, dogwood trees and soybeans. For more information about the research being conducted by the faculty at CAES, visit research.caes.uga.edu. Explore the impact that CAES research has on the real world at apps.caes.uga.edu/impactstatements/.James Hattaway of the UGA Office of the Vice President for Research contributed to this release. “As the university’s research productivity continues to increase, so does our ability to make a positive impact on our state, nation and world,” said UGA President Jere W. Morehead. “I am grateful to our outstanding faculty, whose commitment to excellence is helping to strengthen UGA’s position among the top public research universities in the country.” CAES’s external research funding totals helped contribute to a record-breaking year for research funding across the university. center_img Part of the bump in research funding across the university was a significant increase in funding from the National Science Foundation, highlighting UGA’s strength in plant research. In fiscal year 2016, research expenditures at UGA increased by 14 percent to reach $175.3 million. UGA’s dramatic increase in fiscal year 2016 comes on the heels of a 7 percent increase in fiscal year 2015 for a 21 percent rise over the past two years. “This (achievement) was only possible because of the extraordinary efforts of our dedicated faculty, staff and graduate students,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of CAES. “We’re proud of their creativity, their hard work and their commitment to identifying solutions to the challenges that face Georgia, our nation and the world.” last_img read more

Market locks in historic rate cut

first_imgA historic rate cut next week is expected to spur on homeowners if passed on by financiers. Picture: Liam Kidston.A historic rate cut come Tuesday is expected to save thousands for some homeowners, with the market now locking in a fall to 1.25 per cent — and the potential for more to come.In the past week, the market has dramatically thrown itself behind a drop of 25 basis points, with ASX’s 30 Day Interbank Cash Rate Futures June 2019 contract trading at 98.72 — which it said indicated “a 100 per cent expectation of an interest rate decrease to 1.25 per cent at the next RBA Board meeting”.According to RateCity, the current lowest home loan rate – for one year fixed – was 2.99 per cent from Greater Bank, while the lowest variable rate was 3.29 per cent from Mortgage House. Potential rate cut savings on different loan amounts: Source: FinderFinder has been telling borrowers “if you don’t get the full rate cut, vote with your feet” by switching to a different mortgage.“A lower cash rate will spur even further competition within the market so it is the perfect time to weigh up your options as you have the bargaining power — the best value home loan rates right now start with a ‘3’.”Griffith University’s Mark Brimble and Noel Whittaker of the Queensland University of Technology were among the minority experts who believed the RBA would hold come Tuesday.“I am probably wrong but I think dropping would be a very bad policy — hope the bank realises that,” Mr Whittaker said. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Experts have swung behind a drop, with 32 of the 35 experts in the Finder Cash Rate Survey (91 per cent) now predicting a cut come Tuesday — with 60 per cent expecting it would bottom out at 1 per cent while a third believed it would go 0.75 per cent or even lower.Finder insights manager Graham Cooke said “we can be fairly certain of the direction the cash rate will take in June — the writing is on the wall”. MORE: $1.5m house that won’t be lived in Wotif you could escape to this heritage house? Mr Brimble said “bias is clearly to the easing, however the RBA may choose to wait for the new financial year for a range of reasons including the finalisation of the budget bills and how geo-political issues play out on the global stage and markets”.Nerida Conisbee of the REA Group was among those who’ve now switched to a decrease after holding out for a while.“I’ve gone against popular opinion and have held off calling a cut until now. I think this month will be it,” she said. “While there has been a lot of poor economic data coming out, it looked like the RBA were holding on to the low unemployment rate as a sign that things were about to improve. With the unemployment rate ticking up in April, I think this will be enough impetus to make a decision to cut.”center_img Jobs figures were among the reasons RBA was said to have held out last month – something it can’t really justify this month according to REA Group economist Nerida Conisbee. Picture: AAP Image/Josh Woning.But he said the questions that needed answering were “how much will they cut by, and how many cuts will follow this one?”.Westpac expects three cuts by the end of the calendar year, a view that one in five Finder survey respondents (22 per cent) supported.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoAccording to Finder analysis, just one rate cut passed on could save someone on a $500,000 home loan more than $900 a year.“This snowballs to an annual saving of more than $2,600 should the three cuts come to fruition, with a reduced average variable rate of 4.16 per cent.” Thousands of agents flock to the Coast Baby boomer ‘house party’ goes off FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTERlast_img read more