Earthquake-displaced Charleston congregation returns to historic home

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Both the Family Eucharist and the later Choral Eucharist were completely full for the joyful homecoming. Photo/Nancy Ezell Suggs[Episcopal News Service] Displaced for one year, one month, and one week, the congregation of Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, returned home to its historic sanctuary this past Sunday, Sept. 30.A fixture of the city skyline for 167 years, the Gothic church was condemned following the Virginia earthquake of August 2011, after seismic sensors detected movement in the clerestory walls. After extensive and painstaking work to replace and strengthen disintegrating 19th century mortar, Grace was deemed “safer than the day it was built,” and reopened for Feast of St. Michael and All Angels.In his family service homily, Grace’s rector, the Rev. Canon Michael Wright, said: “Yes, our walls have been strengthened, but in revealing that weakness, the entire church has been healed and strengthened in community, from without and within…Like the Children of Israel, we would never have chosen to endure a time in the wilderness, but we did discover some incredible gifts along the way. And we have discovered God in new ways and in different places.”In 2006, Grace Church was poised to build a new parish hall to serve its growing congregation. During preparations, engineers discovered that the limestone mortar used in brick construction in the 1800s had become weak and powdery over time, causing the tower to lean and extensive cracking in its clerestory walls. Phase I in 2008 stabilized the steeple and included installation of corrosion-proof metal rods, and the injection of an epoxy substance in thousands of bored holes in the masonry walls. This work, which extended over three years at a cost of approximately $10 million, was completed in 2010. The planned second phase had to be expedited following the 2011 Virginia earthquake, which caused the clerestory walls to delaminate and the historic church to be condemned. After being displaced for more than a year, it reopened on Sept. 30 in time for the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels. Photo/Nancy Ezell SuggsDuring most of the reconstruction, the 9 a.m. family service was held in the church’s parish building, Hanahan Hall. But early services were held next door at Mt. Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church, and for the 11 a.m. Eucharist, Grace has been a recipient of the generous hospitality of the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the Carolinas—St. Mary of the Annunciation. These friendships promise to remain; Wright has been asked to deliver the homily for a Sunday Roman Catholic Mass in October.The congregation has celebrated both Easter and Christmas Lessons and Carols in the Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue, an offering of a sacred space that celebrated the unity between two faiths. The city’s Lutheran, Unitarian, Episcopal and Presbyterian churches have generously opened their doors for weddings, baptisms, funerals, and festivals during this yearlong time of both wandering and welcome.Indeed, Grace Church received encouragement from the wider Episcopal Church family, from Holy Cross Faith Memorial at Pawley’s Island, from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, to the clergy and leaders throughout the church. The Episcopal congregation has expressed its gratitude for being part of a church that is praying for them beyond its borders.“Did we know such goodness was present, freely offered and joyfully celebrated beyond our own sacred walls?” Wright asked during his sermon. “We do now!”The church was filled Sept. 30 for both the 9 a.m. Family Eucharist and the 11 a.m. Choral Eucharist, with members old and young, new and long standing.Anne Hawkes, a retired English professor and church greeter, admits she will miss the close-knit parish hall services. “You could look across the room and see families and people you knew. It was more intimate,” she said. “But of course, I’m thrilled we’re back in the church. I’ve missed going to the communion rail in the sanctuary. It was funny though, in Hanahan Hall, you couldn’t kneel; there wasn’t room. Today, we got to the parts of the services where we typically kneel, and we had to feel our way again.”Nancy Ezell Suggs, director of parish life, called this first day of service “emotional overload. I could see older parishioners coming in, and the return was so important to them. But also the kids…the Children’s Choir was thrilled. And some of our new children had never been in the church, or if they were very young, they had no memory of it.”Grace’s rector, the Rev. Canon Michael Wright, conducts the children’s sermon during the Family Eucharist on Sunday, Sept. 30, with a little help from puppet, Bartholomew the Sheep (on the arm of Rob Donehue, director of youth & young adult ministries). Photo/Nancy Ezell SuggsBartholomew, the rowdy sheep puppet (on the arm of Rob Donehue, director of youth & young adult ministries) who pokes fun of Father Michael for the benefit of the congregation’s littlest members, asked the children what was different about church today. Small, awed voices piped, “tall” and “big.” But when he asked what was the same, they all shouted, “The people!”“At the 9 o’clock, there was a whole lot of life, and excitement with the children,” said Hawkes. “It was nice to see that you can get that in the big church too.”Grace has been in a prolonged period of growth. A 2010 survey showed that one in four have been members here for fewer than five years, and one in two for fewer than 10 years.In 2005, this flourishing parish began to raise funds to expand its facility. But when architects were called in, they had some distressing news to report, Ezell Suggs said. “The steeple was leaning six inches, the walls were listing. The focus of the campaign changed from expanding ministry to saving our church home.”After the 2011 Virginia earthquake, Grace Church’s clerestory walls were delaminating, separating internally like a zipper. Bolts and plates were used as clamps, with flowable grout used to fill all of the voids, solidifying the entire wall. Weak areas were reinforced and the building’s historic wood timbers were secured. Including all of the bolts and grout holds, over 2000 holes were drilled to stabilize the clerestory walls. Photo/Nancy Ezell SuggsThe first phase of the project, a $12 million renovation of the church tower, began in 2008 and had just been completed when the earthquake struck. The tower remained strong, but sensors indicated that the stucco-over-brick clerestory walls were delaminating, separating internally like a zipper. The problem was serious enough to condemn the church as well as to displace the adjacent church school kindergarten.On Easter Day, Grace launched a new $5 million capital campaign: Home to Grace. The funds have been used to plate and regrout the clerestory walls, and also will be used to pay down the remainder of the loan for the tower work.Despite its displacement, new members have continued to pour into the historic church community for its welcoming environment and energetic attitude. For many, Sunday was their first time entering the historic sanctuary and worshiping from pews instead of folding chairs, and a first chance to see the famous stained glass windows.Engineer Joel Anderson teaches Sunday school and is deeply committed to Grace’s Episcopal Youth Community. Although he acknowledges that the church is its people, not its walls, “We can be a wonderful thriving church in a warehouse, but we want to grow. And it’s hard to grow when you’re crammed in Hanahan Hall. We’re the beneficiaries of a wonderful building, and we are caretakers for the next generation. Our church inspires us in our faith. The high ceilings, the beauty of it, you can’t walk in there without feeling like you’re in a holy place. You have to look up.”Members gathered in a special tent Sunday following the 9 a.m. Family Eucharist. The church’s congregation has been a long period of growth, and is still growing, despite being displaced from its church home for more than a year. During its time in the wilderness, communities of all faiths offered their churches, chapels and synagogues to Grace’s grateful congregation for services, baptisms, funerals, festivals and weddings. Photo/Nancy Ezell SuggsElizabeth Spitz, one of Grace’s young adult members, has been a loyal parishioner since the third grade. As a youth acolyte, one of her favorite memories is of the late rector explaining the concept of deliberate imperfections in church architecture, and pointing out the crosses painted on the ceiling, where one is missing. “I look at that missing cross every time I go up for communion, and I have missed seeing it.”She adds, “Our church is beautiful, and I admire all of the things people do to make it and keep it that way: the flower guild, the embroidered kneelers, the people that make it unique and different. There are kneelers for branches of the armed services, or depicting scenes from the Bible or from our church stained glass windows. People really care about the building and the way it looks and making it beautiful.”Judging from the throngs of delighted children, grandparents, and parents chattering between services, this parish agrees, “It’s good to be home.”— Sarah Moïse Young is a freelance writer and editor in Charleston, South Carolina, and a 25-year member of Grace Episcopal Church. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Earthquake-displaced Charleston congregation returns to historic home Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

NJ bishops allow clergy to officiate at same-sex marriages

first_img Doug Desper says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 21, 2013 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 22, 2013 at 3:08 pm When did General Convention change the definition of marriage in the Canons, Catechism and Prayer Book? That did not happen at the last Convention. The authorization by Convention was to allow a blessing of same gender relationships. That has taken a draconian leap – by activists – to now mean priests legally wedding same gender couples. The absolute dishonesty of this is staggering, but not unexpected. Don’t expect any Title IV action, particularly since this doesn’t involve real estate. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Human Sexuality, Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing [Episcopal News Service]  Same-sex couples in the state of New Jersey began getting married shortly after midnight Oct. 21 after the state’s Supreme Court refused to postponed enactment of a lower court’s ruling.Diocese of Newark Bishop Mark Beckwith said on Oct. 18 shortly after the state Supreme Court opened the door to same-sex weddings that he gave thanks for that action. He said he knew that many diocesan priests were preparing to officiate at those weddings.Beckwith allowed Newark clergy to bless civil unions starting in February 2007 after New Jersey enacted a civil union law. His Oct. 18 statement listed his expectations for clergy who officiate at marriages.In the Diocese of New Jersey, clergy were being sent a pastoral letter Oct. 21 from Bishop George Councell, who is due to retire Nov. 2, and Bishop-elect William H. Stokes, who will be ordained and consecrated that day, outlining guidelines for clergy who are asked to perform same-sex marriages.“We are entering a new era in society and in the life of the Church,” said Councell and Stokes in the letter. “We have both publicly stated our clear support of this right for same-sex couples and rejoice at the court’s decision. Many same-sex couples have longed to have their relationships afforded the same civil rights and privileges as heterosexual couples. It is also true that many same-sex couples long to be married in the Church and to have the sacramental nature of their relationship acknowledged and blessed by, and within, the Church.”Councell and Stokes asked the clergy to have “generous hearts” and to “honor and respect” for those who disagree with the court’s decisions and with the bishops’ decision to permit same-sex marriages in diocesan churches.The bishops in both dioceses told their clergy that they should use the liturgy for same-sex blessings approved at the 2012 General Convention.On Sept. 26, Judge Mary C. Jacobson of the State Superior Court in Mercer County ruled that if the state failed to allow same-sex marriage, it would deprive state residents of rights guaranteed them in June by the U.S. Supreme Court. She ordered the state to begin to allow same-sex marriage on Oct. 21.Republican New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, whom many consider a possible GOP presidential candidate in 2016, said he would appeal the ruling and asked the state Supreme Court to stay Jacobson’s ruling. He had said he wanted the issue put to state voters in a referendum. In February 2012, he vetoed a same-sex marriage bill passed by the state Legislature.However, on Oct. 18, the court refused Christie’s request and the governor announced on Oct. 21 that he was dropping his appeal.Fourteen states and the District of Columbia now allow same-sex marriage. Thirty states ban such marriages and five allow civil unions or comprehensive domestic partnerships. More information is here. Only New Mexico has not enacted legislation allowing or banning marriage or other legal status. That state’s Supreme Court is due to consider the issue at a hearing Oct. 23.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Doug Desper says: November 6, 2013 at 7:27 pm Marriage between a man and a woman was originally defined by a “dominant cultural expression.” And this definition has achieved a validity. Why then should not the definition of marriage be re-defined or defined more broadly by a “dominant cultural expression.?” One has to wonder if some of the late-in-history strictures against same-sex unions were published by the hierarchy of the Church on earth to facilitate the propagation of the faith rather than from a Heavenly revelation. The Bible embraces male and female relationships which constitute a significant percentage of unions; however, it is unfortnately silent on the many types of social and sexual direction which are significant in number to be also considered as legitimate expressions of human interaction. The Church once posited that the earth was indeed flat,but that notion has been superseded; and in other areas of knowledge, there are discoveries which represent huge advances in the knowledge that was extant at the time that history yielded to the advent of Christianity. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 25, 2013 at 9:05 am Canonical disregard to the meaning of marriage in this Church – such as what is being employed in New Jersey – only results in keeping the Church in chronic turmoil. If the wider Church lets this go on it contradicts any critique alleging “lawlessness” of the several departing dioceses who seceded due to their view of incongruence and canonical “cherry-picking” in the decision-making of the wider Church. Based on the Dioceses of New Jersey and Newark’s trajectory for 40 years they appear to be none too concerned about the niceties of such conciliar relations, self-restraint, nor retaining their own membership. Their statistics are hostile witnesses to how a pursuit of revisionism has emptied their pews. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Doug Desper says: October 23, 2013 at 2:52 pm Marriage is and will always be what it was: a relationship of committed mutual self-giving honored by church and state. The definition has not changed. What has changed is who may have access to that relationship. Robert w. Scruggs says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA NJ bishops allow clergy to officiate at same-sex marriages Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC November 4, 2013 at 10:35 pm The State defines what constitutes a legal marriage. The Church has acted as an agent of the State…as in “By the power invested in me by the state of __________, I now pronounce you Husband and Wife. The problem is that on this issue, Christ was pretty specific. (Matthew 19, 4-6)It is also not an anti/pro GLBT issue. In the same chapter of Matthew, I believe Christ tangentially addresses that issue with a great deal of delicacy.The Church always has, and always should bless loving relationships. I just do not believe, if we are followers of Christ, we should call these rites “marriage” within the Church. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (8) Doug Desper says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC October 21, 2013 at 10:54 pm Wonderful news–and I hope it continues to spread across the country. Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Gretchen R Naugle says: Rector Martinsville, VA November 5, 2013 at 7:31 am David —I agree with you about blessing a committed relationship, but not distorting marriage to accomplish that. The Church has for all of its history decided that difference, mainly by being faithful to the words of Jesus. When the dominant cultural expressions perverted the meaning of marriage, the Church continued to teach the Biblical design. If marriage is but a contract then that means that the Church is reduced to the mere chaplain to Caesar. Forgetting the legal contract, there is the sacramental nature of marriage that the Church was given as an apostolic teaching by Christ himself. Matthew 19 refers back to Genesis 2. This generation of Episcopalians has not found anything “new” which would require revision. Notwithstanding that, the older Prayer Books’ language on marriage have been tossed away as has the Scriptural basis behind the liturgy. God’s design in Genesis 2 has been distorted through many guises: marital slavery, multiple wives, chattel, etc. Each time these cultures have demanded some type of “new” understanding and have equally demanded religious consent to it. Our point of reference should always be that marriage is a sacrament referred to by Christ, and it’s not just an acknowledgement of an expression of love in this “new” time. I’m afraid, however, that each succession of General Conventions will have delegates who want to make their mark on the world — and I pray to God that they don’t smudge us all with the mark of Cain. Submit a Press Release David Halsted says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Same-Sex Blessings, November 7, 2013 at 8:19 pm Genesis 2 shows that God defined the marital relationship of one man-one woman. Jesus quoted it in Matthew 19 as the desired standard. If we can’t see that then what else can be said? Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Same-Sex Marriage Don Caron says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tagslast_img read more

Looking back at that unbelievable attack on Ronan O’Gara, on a ‘bad day for rugby’

first_imgTuesday May 19, 2020 Looking back at that unbelievable attack on Ronan O’Gara, on a ‘bad day for rugby’ Very few punishments have created such a divide in opinion as Joe Marler’s ten-week ban handed to him in March. The England prop was at the centre of a lot of controversy during the Six Nations when he crossed the line with his buffoonery and made his now-infamous grab of Wales captain Alun Wyn Jones’ genitals during play at Twickenham.ADVERTISEMENTThe reaction ranged from calls for a lifetime ban to dismissing it as a non-event, so the subsequent ban also proved to be contentious.This was only made worse by the fact that the COVID-19 pandemic has meant he will not actually miss a game, as the suspension from the virus came into place the week he was banned, and will likely extend beyond the ban’s ending on June 7th.While these are unforeseen circumstances that have fortuitously worked out for Marler, it is certainly not the first time that this has happened.One such ban came after one of the most ill-tempered games in the modern era; the British and Irish Lions’ contest with the New South Waratahs on June 23rd, 2001.The match had not even passed five seconds before Waratahs lock Tom Bowman saw yellow for an elbow to Danny Grewcock, which ultimately set the tone for what Lions coach Graham Henry called a “bad day for rugby”.ADVERTISEMENTBut Bowman’s antic’s at the Sydney Football Ground paled into insignificance compared to what his teammate Duncan McRae was about to unleash upon Ronan O’Gara in the second half.Following the Irishman’s clearout of the fullback at a ruck, he was subject to an onslaught of eleven punches to the face while he lay defenceless on the floor. The referee Scott Young and the touch judge effectively had front row to this assault, making the decision to brandish the red card an easy one.The claret-faced flyhalf was ushered from the field with a swollen left eye and a gash underneath which required eight stitches.The image of the Munsterman’s mutilated face has been consigned to Lions folklore, and at the time led to accusations of a plot to provoke the tourists ahead of the first Test against the Wallabies a week later.ADVERTISEMENTThe Australian has since claimed that there had been a continuous back-and-forth between him and O’Gara throughout the match, and what he believed to be a swinging arm had incensed him. However, that does not come close to justifying what he did.The Lions went on to win 41-24 in a match that had at one point three Waratahs players off the field and two more of the tourists in the sin bin as well.McRae was handed a seven-week ban, something that did not sit well with his victim, who thought that was too lenient. The player’s remorse and public apology, although never personal, were factors in the ban’s length, as well as his previous good character- even Richard Hill, who was formerly a teammate of McRae’s at Saracens but was his opponent on this occasion, described this as out of character.But with the Super Rugby season already over, this ban meant the Waratahs player never missed a game in blue, and was ready to line up against the Chiefs in the first game of the 2002 season, which may have embittered some all the more.When comparing this to Marler’s ban 19 years later, the evolution of the game is undeniably illuminated. There is no escape from cameras these days, and with longer bans a violent salvo as seen in 2001 is seldom, if ever, seen in the professional game today. Further still, a seven-week ban would be met with far more dismay than it was at the beginning of the century.For better or for worse, the rise of social media has meant that players are scrutinised on a level that would have been unimaginable just over a decade ago. Reflecting on the incident in 2012 with the Sydney Morning Herald, McRae said how fortunate he was that it was in another era. He said: “I’m lucky there was no Twitter back then. I reckon I would have copped a lot of abuse.”Conversely, O’Gara vexed after the match at the lack of censure directed at McRae, saying to the Guardian: “If we’d done what McRae did, I’m quite sure what the headlines would be in Australia. If the shoe was on the other foot we would be reading about it for the next 12 years.”While it is dangerous territory to compare transgressions and punishments from a different time, this match in 2001 shows how much the game has changed. Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Big Hits & Dirty Play Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO Suspensions handed down after testicle grabbing… 26 WEEKS AGO The ‘double ruffle’ splits opinion with fans… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: The nastiest and most brutal moments… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Fourie explains how THAT famous try against the Lions in 2009 was scored seconds after getting a finger in the eye

first_imgWednesday May 26, 2021 Fourie explains how THAT famous try against the Lions in 2009 was scored seconds after getting a finger in the eye Former Springbok great Jaque Fourie has told the story of how he somehow managed to score that famous try against the British and Irish Lions despite having just received a finger in the eye. ADVERTISEMENTThe 72-times capped Springbok, who holds the record of having scored a try against every Test team he played against, was speaking to former midfield partner Jean de Villiers and Bok flanker Schalk Burger on their Use it or Lose it Show.Fourie, who crossed the whitewash 32 times in Tests, was asked to discuss the Lions tour and that crucial try he scored in the second Test in 2009.After watching a clip of the try – with a comical Hugh Bladen commentary impersonation – Fourie details how a few phases earlier, he took a switch ball from Morne Steyn and ended up getting a finger in the eye from one of the players.That’s why he moved out to the wing, and found himself out of position for a moment that will be etched in history for all time.“I actually stood up and couldn’t see properly. So that’s why I ran out to the wing,” he says.“I was standing there and I couldn’t see, and as I looked up, the ball was coming. The most amazing thing was I caught it with one eye!”ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 2 WEEKS AGO Sevu Reece shows brilliant athleticism to… 3 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Barrett vs Daly long-range kicking… 3 WEEKS AGO Outrageous Mo’unga hat-trick demonstrates… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Eagle Ridge Student Housing / BVH Architecture

first_img Area:  9000 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Paul Crosby Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Projects United States Save this picture!© Paul Crosby+ 20Curated by María Francisca González Share Manufacturers: Berridge, James Hardie, Marvin, Palram “COPY” Landscape Architect: Year:  MEP Engineer: Clark Enerson Partners Eagle Ridge Student Housing / BVH Architecture ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/891208/eagle-ridge-student-housing-bvh-architecture Clipboard “COPY” Photographs Eagle Ridge Student Housing / BVH ArchitectureSave this projectSaveEagle Ridge Student Housing / BVH Architecture Clark Enerson Partners Structural Engineer: Sampson Construction ArchDaily Architects: BVH Architecture Area Area of this architecture project Civil Engineer: Construction Manager: Olsson Associates CopyHousing, Dorms•Chadron, United States ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/891208/eagle-ridge-student-housing-bvh-architecture Clipboard 2014 CopyAbout this officeBVH ArchitectureOfficeFollowProductsGlassSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingEducational ArchitectureOther facilitiesDormsChadronUnited StatesPublished on March 22, 2018Cite: “Eagle Ridge Student Housing / BVH Architecture” 22 Mar 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StoneShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectDoorsRaynorGarage Door – Advantage SeriesConcreteSika3D Concrete PrintingSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Bre-ClassSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows in Villa LakesideSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Smart CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing in Roofs & CanopiesSound BoothsFrameryMeeting Pod – Framery Q – Flip n’ FoldWall / Ceiling LightsAsaf WeinbroomLighting – Linestra 110 BrassMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Olsson Associates Client:Chadron State CollegeProject Architect:Mark Bacon, Dan WorthProject Manager:Dennis CoudrietCity:ChadronCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Paul CrosbyRecommended ProductsWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40WindowsVEKAWindows – SOFTLINE 82 ADWindowsKalwall®Facades – Window ReplacementsWindowsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Casement Windows – Rabel 8400 Slim Super Thermal PlusText description provided by the architects. Chadron, Nebraska, is situated at the intersection of the rolling sandhills and the jagged Black Hills, home to Mount Rushmore. Located at this unique place is Chadron State College, a four-year public college, with a growing student population.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbyTo accommodate this growth the administration desired a new student housing option, the first since the 1960s. A parcel of grassland east of campus is master planned as a student housing neighborhood complete with outdoor amenities and a community building to support indoor activities.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbyIn contrast to most residence halls that house hundreds of students, Eagle Ridge is home to only 23 students per building to support communal living and the development of social soft skills.Save this picture!PlansThe constructed phase 1 consists of three houses integrated within the natural environment. Utilizing the landscape the buildings strategically negotiate the topography to provide ongrade entries at both levels while preferencing views and solar exposure. The housing units are set close together, creating common areas and walkways that help foster strong, lasting relationships between students and the community.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbyThe interior of each building is arranged as a cluster of six, suite-style apartments that feature a common living room, kitchenette, and compartmentalized bathroom. Each bedroom is single bed occupancy, and the upper level features a student lounge. A covered porch adjacent to the student lounge and a deck covering the lower level entry provides outdoor spaces for students. To maximize the 9,000 square foot buildings meant the stairways had to be captured to double as a place to congregate or overlook the surrounding rolling prairie.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbySave this picture!MassingSave this picture!© Paul CrosbyEagle Ridge utilizes forms reminiscent of local homes and typical agrarian architecture, with the small-scale units drawing heavily on the established visual language of the region. The form is reduced to a plinth, which engages the topography, and a shroud which encloses the upper level program including the porch. The exposed concrete finish of the plinth is an authentic material of the region used to express the it’s connection with the earth. The shroud is formed of bonderized standing seam roofing with batten covers articulated to elevate a rather conventional roof system. To maintain the purity of the shroud no roof penetrations were considered. Cleverly the vent stacks are hidden beneath perforated sections of the standing seam roof in the middle, lower portion of the roof. Essentially the roof in this area acts as a large vent cap with the waterproof enclosure hidden from site.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbyThe gable ends of each house are illuminated with backlit polycarbonate panels to provide site security lighting while also creating a visual beacon from campus proper. A ventilated attic space called for gable vents which, again, are cleverly hidden behind the polycarbonate panels using open cell vents typically used in masonry cavity construction allowing the free movement of air where the polycarbonate panels and lap siding touch.Save this picture!© Paul CrosbyProject gallerySee allShow lessPassive House Pavilion of Longfor Sundar / SUP AtelierSelected ProjectsHarvard GSD Appoints Mark Lee as Chair of Department of ArchitectureArchitecture NewsProject locationAddress:1000 Main St, Chadron, NE 69337, United StatesLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Housinglast_img read more

Timebank gets £457,500 for new strategic media unit

first_imgTimebank gets £457,500 for new strategic media unit About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital Volunteering Howard Lake | 8 October 2003 | Newscenter_img  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Read ‘TimeBank wins 500k lottery cash’ by Tash Shifrin at SocietyGuardian. Volunteering agency TimeBank has been awarded £457,500 by the Community Fund to develop a strategic media unit.The agency is described by SocietyGuardian as “threatened” financially because its core government funding from the Home Office’s Active Communities Unit (ACU), comprising 72% of its total income, comes to an end in March 2004. It is currently under review.Timebank will also receive support for the new development from the BBC, Channel 4 and Granada. Advertisementlast_img read more

Dogs Trust uses online virtual tour to promote rehoming centres

first_imgDon’t skip the intro to the virtual tour and you’ll see content that could be used equally well in support of a capital appeal. The video explains the layout of the rehoming centre.The whole tour demonstrates just what can be done at relatively low cost in terms of giving supporters access to a building, whether one in use today or one for which funding is required. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 5 October 2004 | News Dogs Trust uses online virtual tour to promote rehoming centres About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img  32 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Virtual tours and 360 degree panoramas have been available on the Web for years, but dog welfare charity Dogs Trust has used the technology to produce a practical virtual tour of one of its rehoming centres that includes good fundraising content.The virtual tour is designed to promote the charity’s new purpose-built rehoming centres around the UK. Available in two formats, one for those with broadband access and the other for dial-up users, the tour offers 360 degree views inside the various rooms of one of these centres. Every move you make through the virtual rooms is accompanied by a statistic in an accompanying box that includes a fundraising message. A good example of Paws Related Marketing, it could be said.There is an element of humour in the tour, as your tour guide is ‘Rover Jack’, a Jack Russell that barks appreciatively as you explore the centre. Advertisement Tagged with: Capital appeal Digitallast_img read more

Mariela Castro Espín, a leader of Cuban Revolution, hosted by the International Action Center

first_imgMariela Castro Espín, April 25. Seated is LeiLani Dowell.WW photo: Brenda RyanNew York — An inspiring and electrifying meeting was held at the Solidarity Center in New York City on April 25 featuring Mariela Castro Espín, the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education (CENESEX) in Havana, Cuba, and a deputy of the Cuban parliament, the National Assembly of People’s Power. The meeting was sponsored by the International Action Center. Due to security concerns and limited seating, it was an invitations-only meeting.The multinational, multigenerational crowd — which included members of the LGBTQ+, Latin American, and African-American communities — was moved to tears by the momentous gains in Cuba, described by Castro Espín, in combatting homophobia, transphobia and sexism, as well as racism. Castro Espín stressed that these issues are, above all, class issues, and that her country continues to fight for equality on all levels. She also praised the efforts of the U.S. activists in the crowd, saying she felt very much at home with those at the meeting.  Pro-Cuban revolutionary posters and banners encircled the office.Comments from the floor showed the depth of respect, love and solidarity for Castro Espín and the Cuban revolution. Lucy Pagoada of Honduras USA Resistencia described how the Cuban revolution served to inspire the resistance in Honduras and throughout Latin America to continue, and the exciting integration and unity of those struggles.Nieves Ayress from La Peña del Bronx, who survived torture under the fascistic Pinochet regime in Chile during the early 1970s and Marina Diaz, a Guatemalan activist from the May 1 Coalition also paid tribute to Castro and the Cuban revolution.Black activist, Brenda Stokely, a leader of the Million Worker March Movement, publicly thanked Cuba for providing political asylum to Assata Shakur.A member of TransJustice, a program of the Audre Lorde Project that fights for the rights of transgender and gender-non-conforming people of color in the U.S., said that CENESEX seemed like a “paradise” for their constituents. Among many projects undertaken in support of the transgender community in Cuba, Castro Espín and CENESEX pushed for legislation allowing transgender people in Cuba to receive hormones and gender reassignment surgeries free of charge. The law was passed in June of 2008.Solidarity messages were also delivered from Leslie Feinberg, a member of Workers World Party and a world-renowned author and activist for LGBTQ+ rights, and IAC founder and former U.S. attorney general, Ramsey Clark.Teresa Gutierrez, IAC co-director, urged everyone to “get on the bus” for a June 1st protest in Washington, D.C., in support of the Cuban Five, five Cuban heroes unjustly imprisoned in U.S. federal prisons for attempting to protect their country from terrorist attacks. See thecuban5.org for more information and call 347-201-3728 for $5 round-trip bus tickets from New York to Washington, D.C.Gutierrez went on to say, “The LGBTQ community here has made great strides and has even won the right of same-sex marriage in some states in the U.S. But what socialist Cuba has done for LGBTQ people has gone much further and is much deeper thanks to the building of socialism there.”Castro Espín is also a member of the Direct Action Group for Preventing, Confronting, and Combatting AIDS, and director of the journal, Sexología y Sociedad.  She was denied the right to travel to Philadelphia by the U.S. State Department to attend the Equality Forum 2013 Summit, a May 2-5 global LGBTQ+ conference, where she was scheduled to receive an award.Cuban diplomats are denied the right to travel beyond a 25-mile radius from within New York without permission from the U.S. government, another example of more than 50 years of U.S. government hostility exhibited against the sovereignty of the Cuban Revolution.The writer, a LGBTQ+ activist, gave a welcoming to Castro Espín at the meeting.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Help build a Workers World!

first_img If you’re sick, sick, sick of endless wars, bombings and drones, and oppose the U.S. invasion of Iraq and Syria, If you are in solidarity with the dynamic Black Lives Matter struggle in the forefront of fighting police terror and structural racism, If you detest the bankers and bosses making the workers pay for the economic crisis they didn’t create, If you know from reading WW thatcapitalism is at a dead end, If you want to fight for a better way of life based on economic planning and the equitable distribution of wealth the workers create, If you’re lucky enough to still have a job,Then put some of your hard-earned dollars in Workers World and help us put out one of the only remaining progressive weeklies in the U.S. that’s still printed as well as on the Web. We plan to keep issuing a printed edition to hand it out to people on demonstrations, picket lines and street corners.For the past 38 years, WW subscribers have helped maintain the paper by joining the WW Supporter Program. We invite you to sign up today!Please join the Workers World Supporter Program and make a regular donation, no matter how modest. Go to workers.org/donate/ or send checks to Workers World, 147 W. 24th St., 2nd floor, New York, NY 10011, with your name and address; write “For WWSP.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

TCU entrepreneurs learn to be their own boss

first_imgTwitter Lead On committee co-chairs share goals with students Linkedin Office of Religious and Spiritual Life affirms Muslim students in light of online threats Previous articleEquestrian falls to Baylor in a tiebreakerNext articleTCU holds fourth annual TCU Gives Day to gather donations for the university Shane Battis RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ + posts ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Shane Battis The Leap: 10 April Fool’s pranks to try this year Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Twittercenter_img ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ‘The Big Switch:’ Student spends a day in the chancellor’s shoes Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin TAGSBusinessentrepreneurshipNeeleyPopsicles printEvan Saperstein found success with vegan pancake mix. For Carolyn Phillips, it’s gourmet popsicles. Paul Freeman wants to prevent heat exhaustion.Startups are on the rise.After the Great Recession of 2008 led to a steep drop in Americans starting new ventures, data from a recent study by Challenger, Gray & Christmas shows entrepreneurship has been making a comeback over the past seven years.The annual start-up rate peaked last year. In 2016, the start-up rate was 6.1 percent, the highest it’s been since 2009.Former and current Horned Frogs have been part of this movement.Carolyn Phillips, owner and chief alchemist of Alchemy Pops, started her gourmet popsicle company in 2015 and it’s grown quickly.The TCU graduate says she hadn’t planned to start a company but was inspired after she froze a batch of popsicles for her friends, who liked the flavors. From there, Phillips launched Alchemy Pops as a mobile catering company serving her frozen treats at events and out of freezer carts.With several competitors selling similar products in Fort Worth, Phillips emphasizes marketing as the key to staying competitive. To spread the company’s brand, she had to get creative.“I’m just in there shivering, you know, inviting people to help us from a very vulnerable place of saying ‘I am literally freezing inside of this freezer’ but also, ‘I’m a person trying to put this product out into the world,’” she said.Now she’s preparing for a company milestone — opening a retail store on the 400 block of South Main St.“We’ll have somewhere our brand can really come to life for our customers,” Phillips said. “Now they’ll get to walk into a place that’s totally our own, which we’ve never had before.”Alchemy, from which the shop gets its name, refers to transforming something into gold. It’s a process Phillips compared to her journey.“Alchemy Pops as my own business is kind of my own golden opportunity to do something for myself, do something for my family [and] create something that is specific to me that is my vision,” she said.While Phillips prepares for her company’s newest addition, some students are already launching companies before graduation.Paul Freeman, a business information systems and supply chain management double major, is the founder of Headstrong Wearables. His product is a microchip that can help prevent construction workers from collapsing due to heat exhaustion.Freeman noticed this problem during a summer internship working for a railroad where he saw several employees had to be taken to urgent care after an incident. Afterwards, he created the chip, which can be inserted into a hard hat, that tracks an employees’ heart rate, body temperature and blood pressure, so managers can be alerted if they’re in danger.Headstrong Wearables has already received attention from Coleman Industrial Construction, who wants the product to be tested on its job sites.Freeman started promoting his invention during TCU’s Entrepreneurship Club Elevator Pitch Competition, where he won first place.TCU then sponsored his trip to Florida where he pitched again at the Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization’s national conference where he was placed sixth best pitch in the country.“It was just an incredible experience,” Freeman said. “I was able to meet a lot of really incredible entrepreneurs and people in the industry. Hopefully, those connections, moving forward, will be beneficial.”He said there’s been a lot of interest in his product, so he wants to continue working on Headstrong Wearables over the summer.Freeman encourages students to follow their passions by finding a problem in the world that bothers them and making their own solution. He said once they find a passion, “the work is easy.”Evan Saperstein is doing just that, but he’s not a student.The Hays Hall Director is also the creator of Sap N’ Stacks, a brand of vegan pancake mix he created to give people a healthier breakfast option.His company started when he cooked breakfast for the hall director staff during a retreat. Saperstein said many of them were surprised how much they liked his pancakes.“They told me I should jar it and sell it,” he said. “I know they were joking, but I actually jarred it and started selling it.”Evan Saperstein is the creator of Sap N’ Stacks, a brand of vegan pancake mixes. (Photo courtesy of Evan Saperstein)Saperstein talked about how veganism has helped him improve his health.He adopted the vegan diet in 2011 and found that it made competing in triathlons much easier for him, to the surprise of other participants. Training without meat and eggs, he said, was even better for improving his physical fitness.Now he’d like other people to try it out too.Sap N’ Stacks has mostly reached his residents and local marketplaces, so Saperstein pitched his idea at a 1 Million Cups event at the TCU Campus Store to seek feedback. Audience members were receptive to his presentation and tried samples of his miniature pancakes.He expressed his excitement about presenting his brand to an audience for the first time and his hopes to make this his full-time job.“For me to take this on and get the positive response feedback I got here is awesome,” Saperstein said. “It’s just great. It’s like a thumbs up in the right direction.”Students and alumni seeking advice about starting a business can visit the Entrepreneurship Office on the third floor of Smith Hall for help. Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Facebook Facebooklast_img read more