WFF17 – INTERVIEW WITH CAMILLE THOMAN – DIRECTOR OF NEVER HERE

first_imgAdvertisement DIRECTOR’S BIO:  Camille Thoman is a Canadian/American writer/director. Camille wrote and directed the 2017 thriller Never Here starring Mireille Enos, Sam Shepard, Vincent Piazza, Goran Visnjic, Nina Arianda and Desmin Borges. Never Here is a genre-blend between a classic Hitchcockian suspense mystery (Whodunnit?) and a harrowing journey into disintegration of self (Who Am I?). Facebook Login/Register With: WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR YOUR FILM?I would say my biggest influence was the work of novelist Paul Auster. Primarily, The New York Trilogy, but other works as well. When I first read the NY trilogy at the age of 20 or so, I felt like the novelist had reached from the pages of the novel and squeezed my heart. He was able to create detective fiction— intrigue! enthralling suspense!— and then connect out from the pages of the book in 3D and reference me sitting there reading it. It was a shocking moment, to be funneled into a “detective fiction” set up, and then realize that the author is talking about much more than just his plot. I thought: this is something I want to do in cinema. I want to entertain and titillate, but also ask questions of the viewer, reference theme sitting in their chairs, not just allow them to be subsumed by the narrative.WHAT WERE THE GREATEST CHALLENGES YOU FACED DURING THE FILM?Never Here was a hard film to get financed. It took me and a very hardworking team of producers & EPs years– as well as many iterations of cast & budget– until we finally were greenlit. Never Here blends genres, has a complicated female protagonist who may or may not be traditionally likeable, and was directed by a first time feature film filmmaker. It took a lot of dedication and support from a lot of people to put Never Here in the world!WHAT APPEAL DO YOU THINK YOUR FILM WILL HAVE FOR AUDIENCESI love a good, old fashioned thriller. Never Here is a genre-blend between a classic Hitchcockian suspense thriller (Whodunnit?) and a journey into the disintegration of a person’s identity (Who Am I?). Its a film that titallates in the way that all good thrillers must. By bringing in themes of identity, Never Here is also a film that asks an audience to think, question and be active participants.WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A CREATOR?I’ve been directing plays and “movies” since I can remember. First, with my friends. When my friends got too old, with my little sister and her friends. Directing and performing are always what I loved, its how I was born. There was never much question I would do anything else.WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON NEXT?I’m making a horror film! A film set in Northern Canada, about a family who begins to believe it is haunted by a demon…It Follows meets Wind River. Also working on a noir set in China.WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO ASPIRING FILMMAKERS?If you have a great idea, and the drive to manifest the idea, you can do anything. Also, get good at team playing, you need to teamplay a lot in film!WHAT ARE YOUR TOP 3 FAVOURITE FILMS OF ALL TIME?Don’t Look Now; Late August, Early September (A French film by Olivier Assayas); The Shining are the first three that come to mind…IF YOU HAD TO DESCRIBE YOUR FILM IN THREE WORDS … WHAT WOULD THEY BE?Eerie, visceral, disquieting.IF YOU COULD RESHOOT ANY FILM MADE IN THE PAST 20 YEARS, WHICH ONE WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND HOW WOULD YOU CHANGE IT?Well, I haven’t seen The Snowman, but when I read the book I responded viscerally to the images and was dying to get my hands on it! I was sad when someone else got there first!WHO ARE YOUR MENTORS? (AND WHY)The first people that come to mind are my EPs Zachary Quinto and Neal Dodson from Before The Door Pictures (producers of Margin Call and A Most Violent Year). When (EP Greg Ainsworth and I) met them in 2011, they decided they liked the script and would be our “godfathers”. Meaning, they would give us access to talent and potential financing. They (along with Corey Moosa who became a full producer on the movie) sheparded the film, and stuck with it for 8 years, and were consistent streams of encouragement, support, work. Pretty Amazing. I feel all of my producers and EPs were mentors. They were all early believers in the movie, believers in me, a first time filmmaker. They stuck by the movie for years through thick and thin, put either money/time/care into the movie. That’s mentorship! Lastly, my mother is an important mentor for me. She has been very encouraging and supportive of me taking this path. Since its not the easiest of paths, having someone close to me who believed in my work has meant a lot.WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL SHOWTIMES:– NOVEMBER 30, 2017, 3:00 PM – RAINBOW THEATRE– DECEMBER 2, 2017, 1:30 PM – VILLAGE 8 – THEATRE 7GET YOUR TICKETS AT: https://whistlerfilmfestival.com/film/never-here/SYNOPSIS: Disturbing events lead an artist who photographs strangers to suspect that someone out there is watching HER. Boundaries blur between real and imaginary, crime and art, the watcher and the watched.CASTING AND CREDITS:Executive Producers: Greg Ainsworth, Alvin Chau, Luke Daniels, Neal Dodson, Erika Hampson, Brandon K. Hogan, Subi Liang, Dan Milne, Ho-Cheung Pang, Alan Pao, Zachary Quinto, Wenke Sterns, Alex Tong, Wonderbar ProductionsProducers: Julian Cautherley, Radium Cheung, Bronwyn Cornelius, Corey Moosa, Camille Thoman, Before The Door PicturesCast: Mireille Enos, Sam Shepard, Goran VisnjicCinematographer: Sebastian WinterøEditing: Robin Hill, Camille ThomanScreenplay: Camille Thoman Mireille Enos Sam Shepard Vincent Piazza Nina Arianda Goran Visnjic Mireille Enos Never Here – Theatrical Poster GET YOUR TICKETS FOR THE WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL TODAY Twittercenter_img Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Camille’s award-winning documentary The Longest Game will premiere on PBS in Spring 2018. The Longest Game follows a group of zestful octogenarians who meet every day at 1p.m. for a game of “paddle tennis”. This daily game has been going on for 25 years. The Longest Game explores cycles of life, and the relentless forces of time & change. In 2006, Camille directed the short film Falling Objects, starring Mireille Enos, Timothy Hutton, Melissa Leo and Kevin Rahm, also a film about cycles of change. Camille’s solo performance pieces have toured the UK and been performed by her in London at The Young Vic and the Battersea Arts Center. She is a graduate of the University of Bristol, U.K.last_img

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