Is it right that the Aston Martin share price is really a value trap?

first_imgIs it right that the Aston Martin share price is really a value trap? Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy of this special investment report — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Small-Cap Stock… free of charge! The Aston Martin (LSE: AML) share price has been on a downward trajectory since the company’s IPO. Based on this performance, some analysts have speculated that the stock could be a value trap.However, I don’t think this is the case. Today, I’m going to explain why. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Aston Martin share price problems Two key red flags tend to show if a stock is a value trap. First, if it’s active in a sector that’s shrinking. The newspaper industry is a fantastic example. This doesn’t seem to apply to the luxury car manufacturer. Demand for high-end cars has only increased over the past decade. Figures suggest the market will continue to grow at a mid-single-digit percentage for at least the next decade. So, on that basis, it doesn’t look as if Aston is active in a shrinking sector.The second red flag to look out for is debt. A company that has a lot of debt can struggle to return to growth. Debt can act as a weight around the organisation’s neck, which restricts research and development, marketing spending, and prevents the hiring of talent. Unfortunately, the luxury carmaker does have a significant amount of borrowing. This has proven to be a thorn in the side of the business for years. However, unlike most other companies, Aston’s brand is worth its weight in gold. Creditors have been willing to give the business more leeway due to its reputation. What’s more, the company has had no trouble finding new backers willing to lend it more money. As such, while the firm does have a lot of borrowing, I don’t think it makes the Aston Martin share price a value trap. The strength of the company’s brand could be considered to be its most substantial advantage. Some estimates place the value of its brand alone at more than £2bn.Investment opportunity?Considering all of the above, Aston could be an attractive addition to a diversified portfolio at current levels. The stock doesn’t appear to be a value trap, and the company’s brand value is worth significantly more than its current market capitalisation. That said, it could be some time before the business does report a positive net income. The group has struggled to get new products to market in recent years, and that has weighed on the Aston Martin share price.Nevertheless, it has some highly anticipated vehicle releases coming out over the next 12-24 months. I think these should help the business grow its top line and achieve a positive return on investment if all goes to plan. Additional income may also help improve investor sentiment towards the Aston Martin share price, of course. In this optimistic scenario, investors may see a robust initial return on investment.  Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Adventurous investors like you won’t want to miss out on what could be a truly astonishing opportunity…You see, over the past three years, this AIM-listed company has been quietly powering ahead… rewarding its shareholders with generous share price growth thanks to a carefully orchestrated ‘buy and build’ strategy.And with a first-class management team at the helm, a proven, well-executed business model, plus market-leading positions in high-margin, niche products… our analysts believe there’s still plenty more potential growth in the pipeline.Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK investment team all hot-under-the-collar about this tiny £350+ million enterprise… inside a specially prepared free investment report.But here’s the really exciting part… right now, we believe many UK investors have quite simply never heard of this company before! Rupert Hargreaves | Sunday, 25th October, 2020 | More on: AML Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img Image source: Getty Images. The high-calibre small-cap stock flying under the City’s radar Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Rupert Hargreaveslast_img read more

Israel and Palestine issues addressed at legislative hearings

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rula Khoury Borelli says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI General Convention 2015, Katherine Boler says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Gretchen Crawford says: Submit a Press Release Vicki Gray says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 27, 2015 at 4:09 pm Thank you, Vicki. God bless you. Rector Hopkinsville, KY June 27, 2015 at 7:29 am I sense some similarities with South Africa’s apartheid & freedom struggles in the 1980’s regarding divestment and investment in companies. Companies in the Mid-East may not be so clear cutregarding supporting solely Israeli or solely Palestinian. Listening to the Church in Jerusalem and those who live in those affected areas is obviously vital and important. Gretchen Crawford says: June 30, 2015 at 12:33 am Three things that bother me most, perhaps you are already aware of these:*More Palestinian neighborhoods and villages are soon to be destroyed, replaced by Israeli settlements.*Children are processed in military prisons after being taken from their beds at night. This is routine and soldiers allow it to be filmed. Huge child welfare issue. Jewish kids go to normal juvenile courts if there’s an issue.*People in Gaza need basics, like food and clean water.If it was my family or yours, all this talk would seem astonishingly inadequate. I know there are troubled spots world wide. Just so frustrating that our tax dollars pay for almost every penny of this apartite. Divestment would be a small step. But at least it would be a step.I appreciate everyone’s comments deeply. May God bless you, and may God bless everyone in the Holy Land. Erna Lund says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Phoebe Griswold says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET June 27, 2015 at 12:37 am Divestment supports Palestinian human rights by clearly challenging the brutal apartheid conditions that Israel perpetrates on the occupied people. Angllican Archbishop Desmond Tutu supports It. He has the authority to address what works when it comes to ending apartheid. That our Episcopal clergy and lay employees’ benefits come in part from investments in HP and Caterplllar is revolting to me. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 27, 2015 at 1:15 am Good reporting, Matt, really good.All the words of testimony aside, however, I have the feelingthat the bishops and deputies of the legislative committee on social justice and international policy are struggling earnestly with the dichotomy between the fiscal and institutional demands of a hierarchical Church and the moral imperatives of their individual consciences. And, this afternoon, I was heartened that they seemed to find it time to present the House of Bishops not with the usual strawman on this issue, but rather with the same panoply of options they have dealt with the past two days – a set of options that will require the bishops and, through them, the Church to reflect and act on that admonition of Jesus that I fished out of my Gideons” Bible in the North Temple Inn tonight: “For where you treasure is, there will be your heart also.In the context of the curent situation in the Holy Land, that question translates to: Will we finally ask the bishops to decide between divesting from the manifest oppression of occupation and colonization under which Palestinians suffer or continuing the comfortable charade of “positive investment” and the dialogue of the deaf.For me, their answer constituents a critical matter of faith. I will be listening and praying on Sunday. Israel-Palestine, Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA June 29, 2015 at 8:00 pm When the Rt. Rev. Edmond Browning was Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, he wrote words which could take the form of a resolution: “As we Christians make our rightful claim to Jerusalem, we acknowledge that Muslims and Jews also have rightful claims to Jerusalem from their perspectives. It is useless to argue about sovereignty in the Holy City.”Mideast Peace = Peace of Jerusalem = World PeaceJerusalem must be shared in accordance with International Law. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Middle East center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (10) June 27, 2015 at 4:36 pm The call to divest comes from religious and secular Palestinian leaders. See The Kairos Palestine document, and Kairos USA which is a prayerful response tto the first. Divestment may also help Palestinian Christians in exile in , for example in Syria where some of these refugees have been massacred for their faith. When Christians the world over pipe up for Palestiinian human rights they show victims of racial and religious persecution that we are aware of their suffering and support their struggles for respect and justice. Divestment is a loving thing to do. Sometimes ‘tough love’ is called for. It takes courage and williingness to admit the severity of a problem. Rector Belleville, IL By Matthew DaviesPosted Jun 26, 2015 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA June 27, 2015 at 7:37 pm We must stand up and speak out in support of Resolution CO18 for the voiceless and vulnerable Palestinians in the Holy Land, notably West Bank, Jerusalem and Gaza. Indeed during a visit I had expressed concern to the Israeli tour leader regarding settlers and settlements, and he quickly responded that Americans cannot criticize such Israeli policies and tactics as that is what the Americans had done in taking the lands of the Native Americans in colonizing the United States 400 years ago! And with these same brutal tactics of the Israeli military government/Israeli Defense Forces) on the defenseless Palestinians targeting children and families in their homes and villages … these same families ancestors from the early 1900’s were led to believe that they would be returning in a few weeks taking their house keys with them for the return … this is the same brutal tactic which the U.S. military in the early 1800s imposed on the Hawaii monarchy(Queen Liliuokalani) that it was temporary and thus she agreed to prevent blood shed and then she was subsequently arrested and confined/imprisoned in her Iolani Palace. We could not speak out at those historic times for these indigenous Native peoples and the Hawaiians but now the same parallels of subjugation and brutal oppression of indigenous peoples for Power, Money, Greed and Military force. We must demonstrate God’s love for all defenseless peoples with critical compassionate action, and if we are truly living by our Baptismal Covenant as the servants of God. Israel and Palestine issues addressed at legislative hearings TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Gretchen Crawford says: Rector Albany, NY Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA June 28, 2015 at 3:08 pm Again and again we emphasize talking as the way forward to find peace in the Holy Land. I wonder who we are going to have to talk with in the Holy Land when all the Christians are gone! Facts name that the Christian population is dwindling and that there will be no more Christians left in the Holy Land. What is the tremendous loss of Jesus’ Christian presence and witness to this tinder box of the world?While we are talking, boys and girls are learning job skills and children are being treated in the Ahil Hospital all run by the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. Where is our sense of urgency to respond to human need now. What would Jesus do in his home land? Talk and talk and talk? I don’t think so. Let’s look to our own Christian family, The Diocese of Jerusalem, and support them through The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, the organization already in place that I believe is the Church’s best umbrella for working responsibly and transparently with sustaining Christian presence NOW! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The Israeli-Palestinian conflict was the focus of three legislative hearings June 25 as the Social Justice and International Policy Committee opened the floor for public testimony at the Episcopal Church’s 78th General Convention.Some 50 people rose to testify on the seven resolutions related to Israel and Palestine that range from calling for deeper investment in Middle East partnerships to calling the church to boycott against and divest from companies and corporations engaged in certain business related to the State of Israel.Several speakers addressed the need to end the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land through economic pressure, saying that the church’s current policy of positive investment has proved inadequate. Others underscored the Christian imperative for engagement and dialogue, citing concerns for any action that might cause further widespread hardship for the Palestinian people and the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem.During an evening hearing, Bishop Nick Knisely of the Diocese of Rhode Island presented his two resolutions (B012 and B013), backed by 10 other bishops, urging The Episcopal Church to endorse a model of restorative justice in seeking “new, creative and effective ways forward in its work toward peace and justice in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” and to call political leaders to a conclusive negotiation of a two-state peace agreement.Knisely said his resolutions are about reconciliation, trying to find a process within The Episcopal Church where conversations are had and “where we can see one another not as the person who has caused the pain, but as the person who is also in pain … . I am not naïve about how long it will take, but I do not know of a more effective way.“I realize there is a disparity of views,” he said, “but we need to find ways to invest in Palestinian businesses so that they can build their economy and hopefully become an equal partner.”Paul Schumacher from Hawaii said the two resolutions complement and extend existing policies and offer some suggestions on how to move forward from the 2012 General Convention Resolution B019, which affirms positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories.Lynn Gottlieb, an American rabbi in the Jewish Renewal movement, is not so convinced. “As Palestinians are pushed into an apartheid-like situation … it is almost impossible for them to export anything,” she said. “I encourage you to invest, but know that until the occupation ends, Palestinians will always be vulnerable to having their exports destroyed. Palestinian business people will always say to me, ‘yes invest and divest.’ They are not in conflict. This is restorative justice.”Earlier in the day, testimony was heard on five other resolutions, three of which call for divestment.The Rev. Vicki Gray, a deputy from the Diocese of California who spoke in support of Resolution C012, said that “divestment is not about anti-Semitism; it’s about justice … The people of Palestine want action, not more talk … It should be clear that after 20 years of talk in the never-ending peace process, our policy of positive investment has not worked … To do nothing would also have an impact: It would put us on the side of oppression.”Clark Downs of the Diocese of Washington, speaking in favor of Resolution C018, said that for several decades The Episcopal Church “has been aware of the strife in the Holy Land and vainly hoped that the people there would do something about it. Israeli leadership has turned a blind eye to injustice and kept up the illegal occupation. The Episcopal Church should respond more boldly to this tragedy than it has in recent years.”T. Dennis Sullivan, chair of the Executive Council Investment Committee, said the committee has discussed these issues and unanimously requests that any resolutions calling for divestment should be rejected “until the economic and social consequences of such divestment are thoroughly evaluated.”A liaison to the Committee from the Presiding Bishop’s staff confirmed that the investment portfolio of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society contains no holdings in any of the corporations some of the resolutions flag as problematic, such as Caterpillar, Hewlett Packard, G4S, and Motorola Solutions.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, however, did invest $500,000 in the Bank of Palestine in 2013 for the purpose of economic development in the Palestinian Territories.The Church Pension Fund, whose investment policies are not required to mirror those of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, currently owns holdings in Caterpillar and Hewlett Packard, according to Church Pension Group chief investment officer Roger Sayler.CPF “is committed to its fiduciary responsibility to protect the pensions and related benefits” of some 15,000 clergy and lay employees of The Episcopal Church, Sayler said during the hearing. “We must be positively involved in the situation rather than using divestment as a tool.”The Church Pension Fund and its affiliated companies collectively form the Church Pension Group.The Rev. Jose Luis Mendoza-Barahona, a committee member from the Diocese of Honduras, challenged Church Pension Group to revise its practices.“Approximately 15,000 people are being protected by this pension plan. But I do believe that a life is more important and has more value than anything we can do,” he said through an interpreter. “I would like to invite you to re-engineer the investment process so that it would allow those 15,000 people to maintain their stability but also to allow us to assist those people in Israel and Palestine whose rights are being taken away from them. I hope that you find a way to place the money where it can do some good and take it away from companies that are hurting poor people in Palestine.”The Rev. Canon John E. Kitagawa, a deputy from the Diocese of Arizona, has served on the Standing Commission on Anglican and International Peace With Justice Concerns, one of the church’s interim bodies that are proposing Resolution A052 for consideration at General Convention.A052 calls for an “intentional process of Ubuntu,” and “peaceful, mutual discernment” regarding Episcopal Church policies “toward advocacy, economic investment or divestment, humanitarian mission, and peacemaking in Palestine and Israel.”Ubuntu is a Zulu/Xhosa word that describes human identity as being formed through community and encompassing a sense of caring, sharing and being in harmony with all of creation.The resolution suggests that a collaborative group should facilitate the process, collect and disseminate educational resources, and consult with a wide range of policy experts, humanitarian aid organizations, and ecumenical and interfaith groups “to inform and enliven a process of listening and conversation among those of differing convictions … so that The Episcopal Church in its deliberations and advocacy efforts might model the love of God and the possibility of civil dialog over controversial and confounding issues of global conflict.”Kitagawa, vice chair of General Convention’s international policy legislative committee, believes that Resolution A052 is the best approach at this time for The Episcopal Church on peacemaking in Israel and Palestine.The Rev. Susan Snook, a deputy from the Diocese of Arizona and a member of Executive Council, also supports Resolution A052. She said that following a visit to the Holy Land last year and talking to people on all sides, “I’ve learned that there are no simple solutions [that] will solve all the problems” and that the best way forward as Christians “is to remain engaged in relationships. … We need to use those relationships to help change minds and hearts.Snook said that she spoke with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and others who traveled to the Holy Land in January as part of an interfaith pilgrimage recommended by Resolution B019 from the 2012 General Convention. “They heard from people on all sides that Christians … can show people how to disagree respectfully and remain in relationship. I support the Ubuntu resolution. It’s what people in the Holy Land have asked of us. Diocesan institutions and ministries are possible because we have been remained engaged even though we deplore the violence. Divestment hurts the economy and hurts Palestinians.”Newland Smith, a deputy from the Diocese of Chicago spoke in favor of Resolution D016, which was drafted by the recently formed Episcopal Committee for Justice in Israel and Palestine, calling on The Episcopal Church to begin a process of divesting from companies that continue to profit from the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land.“U.S. companies that are contributing to the infrastructure that supports occupation must be held accountable,” said Smith, a member of the international policy committee. “This resolution provides a reasoned and prudent pathway for the church to be faithful for the cause of justice in this long and painful conflict.”Walid Issa, 26, a Palestinian from Bethlehem said he was “sad … that the people who matter the most in these discussions are not represented here. The importance of helping and investing in the Palestinians is more urgent than punishing the Israeli government. The problem is where to invest. We need to shift and find new, innovative and creative ways for the young Palestinian voices to be represented … Change is possible and fear can be defeated.”Issa, along with Israeli Lior Frankiensztajn, run the Shades Negotiation Program, which creates opportunities for Palestinian and Israeli decision-makers, politicians, educators and other leaders to meet and engage with their counterparts. The program is sponsored by Harvard University and partly funded by the U.S. Department of State.During the committee hearing, Frankiensztajn, 29, said that after serving in the Israeli army for five years, he “realized there is no military solution to this problem – it has to be a social solution.”Frankiensztajn’s world changed a few years ago after he lived with a Palestinian man for two months. He got to learn many things about himself and his roots, but most importantly, he saw “how reality looks from a different perspective,” he told the interfaith pilgrims following lunch in a Tel Aviv restaurant. Unfortunately, “politicians manage the relationships, which limits the opportunity for progress. … There has to be a different approach to policymaking, to education.”Acknowledging that it is easy to engage the converted, Frankiensztajn said that Shades is trying to identify the obstacles, areas that need more attention in helping people “to become better negotiators, better communicators through this experience [and] really getting to understand the nuances and the culture of the other side.” Creating trust, he added, is a critical part of the peace process.Kim Byham, an alternate deputy from the Diocese of New Jersey, spoke in support of Resolution C018, submitted by the Diocese of Washington, with the exception of the fifth paragraph, which calls for a full and public report “documenting all actions, including corporate dialogues and shareholder resolutions … regarding companies that contribute to the infrastructure of Israel’s ongoing occupation of the West Bank and Gaza and companies that have connections to organizations responsible for violence against Israel.”The rest of Resolution C018 calls for continued support of the Diocese of Jerusalem and its institutions and calls on “individual parishes to take immediate steps to increase their understanding of the issues so they can engage actively to this end, especially with respect to considering non-violent approaches and actions to ending the occupation in light of the failure of peace talks and continued expansion of settlements.”Byham has served as chair of the Episcopal Church’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility for last six years. He previously served as chair of the church’s Social Responsibility in Investments committee, which in 2005 affirmed “positive investment” and “corporate engagement” to encourage positive change in the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.“Divestment is something our committee has been skeptical about, said Byham, although he said that despite corporate dialogue with Caterpillar for the past 15 years, “they continue to take the same position that they don’t sell directly to the Israeli army, and that’s true, they sell to the U.S. army and the U.S. gives it to Israel.”However, he said, “divestment is a really limited tool [and] it has relatively few positives.”The Rev. Gary Commins, deputy from the Diocese of Los Angeles, disagrees.“We have an opportunity to move on divestment, to do something honorable and memorable,” said Commins, a member of the international policy committee. “To continue on our current policy is to do something forgettable and regrettable.”Many Episcopal Church dioceses and individuals have long-standing partnerships with the Jerusalem diocese and support the ministry of its more than 30 social service institutions throughout Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and the Palestinian Territories. The institutions include schools, hospitals, clinics and centers for people with disabilities.The diocese and the institutions also are supported by the American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, a nonpolitical, nonprofit organization established in 1985.Anne Lynn, director of the American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, spoke in support of mission in the Holy Land and of Resolution C018. “Many view the place where Jesus walked and talked only through the political lens,” she said. “Families need to put food on the table tonight and children need to go to school tomorrow. We should be very proud of the work that is being done by the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. Their schools are educating 7,000 children of all faiths. The diocesan hospitals serve the poor and saved hundreds of lives in Gaza. We can change the future of our Holy Land by building peace from the ground up.”Archbishop Suheil Dawani of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem has previously told Episcopal News Service that he prefers to hear about investment rather than divestment.Graham Smith, dean of St. George’s College, Jerusalem, spoke during the hearing and confirmed that Dawani has not changed his mind on the issue. “I hope this convention does not adopt any resolution about the conflict without checking with the archbishop,” he said. Such action “costs deputies nothing while making it more difficult for the archbishop to manage his institutions. We need to support the institutions as much as possible.”Dawani was not himself present, nor was he officially represented by anybody from the Diocese of Jerusalem, at the General Convention. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori invited Dawani to be a guest of hers at the convention, but he was unable to attend due to other commitments in his diocese.Cynthia Schumacher, a visitor from the Diocese of Hawaii, also spoke against C012. “Israel is the only free nation in the Middle East, but its institutions are constantly under ideological assault. This resolution forgets that many Palestinians support terrorist activities against Jews in Israel and the rest of the world. Israel is an open, multiethnic, multiracial democracy. It is not without fault, but it still offers Christians and Muslims protection from totalitarian states in the region. This is the reality that BDS [boycotts, divestment and sanctions] glosses over and chooses to ignore.”Several supporters and members of the U.S. organization Jewish Voice for Peace spoke out in favor of divestment.Jade Brooks said that Palestinians have been suffering far too long under the occupation. “You have the opportunity to be leaders in the movement for justice,” she told committee members.Other speakers said that the church needs to be doing more in engaging dioceses and congregations, and in educating people around the issues.Retired Bishop of Washington John Chane said that he’d fought against divestment for many years “but times have changed. … This is a matter of human rights. At the same time divestment is an issue that has lots of nuances.” However, he said that he hopes General Convention could pass a resolution that would allow Executive Council “to really make a clear statement on divestment.”The Rev. Scott Gunn, a deputy from the Diocese of Southern Ohio, said that from his two trips to the Holy Land he has realized that “relationships and positive encounter are the way forward … Why don’t we take a positive action of re-investment? It may be that a change in divestment policy would be good at some point, but we mustn’t do it irrationally. Praying for the peace of Jerusalem is what we need to be doing.”The international policy committee will discuss the resolutions and make its recommendations to the initial house of action, which will be the House of Bishops.If the bishops approve a resolution, it would require the House of Deputies to concur with the legislation before it could become an act of General Convention — Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Selena Smith says: The Rev. Roy Hayes says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing June 29, 2015 at 1:12 am As a Christian Palestinian American, I would like to thank the great people of the Episcopal church who are thinking of the welfare of the their fellow Christians, who are living under a brutal and oppressive occupation. Many blessings to you! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

Video: The Community of St. Anselm on their year in…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Lambeth Palace] The Community of St. Anselm, launched by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby last year, speak about their “year in God’s time.”Applications for September 2016 residential membership of the Community of St. Anselm are open until the end of February. Non-residential applications are open until mid-April.In September 2015, the Archbishop of Canterbury invited young Christians from around the world to spend a year living in a new monastic-inspired community based at his residence, Lambeth Palace in London.His vision for the Community of St. Anselm was for young people to follow an intensive pattern of prayer, study and serving local communities that the ancient monastics would have recognized, before taking this experience back into their lives.The community is made up of residential members who live at Lambeth Palace, and non-residential members who commit to the same Rule of Life while continuing in their work or studies in London. Applications to join the Community as a residential member in September are open until the end of February, while non-residential applications will remain open until mid-April.The members, who come from many different countries and church denominations, divide their time between prayer and worship, study, and working alongside vulnerable people with local charities in London.In interviews with the BBC broadcast today, residential members spoke of how they decided to apply and their experience of living in the Community so far.George Karanja, a 28-year-old theology graduate from Nairobi, Kenya, who is training to be an Anglican priest, said: “I was following the Archbishop of Canterbury on Twitter, and when he welcomed young people to live and study and stay with him in Lambeth Palace, I decided to apply.”Agnès Vanhems, a 27-year-old Roman Catholic journalist from Lille, France, said: “It was the right time and the right place to give this time to God to talk to me,” and an opportunity to discover “how I can live the Gospel in my professional life.“What I will keep is if you put God in your heart, everything is possible. Everything can change. It’s really a lesson of life. I think I have more love and more curiosity to discover others, and to love them in their differences.”Joshua Brocklesby, a 26-year-old former advertising executive from Buckinghamshire, UK, said: “I think a lot of people were surprised, but I think they also understand why I’m doing it. They were really supportive, because they understood it was a chance to grow in a way that we don’t normally get the chance in normal life.”To find out more about the Community of St Anselm and apply for September 2016, visit: http://www.stanselm.org.uk Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth & Young Adults Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Video, Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Posted Feb 11, 2016 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Video: The Community of St. Anselm on their year in God’s time The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

‘We want a local bishop’ say Ethiopian Anglicans

first_img‘We want a local bishop’ say Ethiopian Anglicans Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans in the Gambella district of Ethiopia have expressed a desire that their next bishop be local. Within the Anglican Communion, Ethiopia is part of the Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa in the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East.Read the entire article here. Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Africa, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Jan 31, 2018 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Elections Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

People sure are interesting creatures

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Linda George TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleChildhood Cancer – How We Inspire HopeNext articleBounce back… Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply A CAREGIVER’S PRAYERDear lord, please help me to be joyful in care-giving.  Help me to bring peace and love to everyone I meet.  Help me to see the flowers, to feel the sunshine, to revel in a spring shower, to skip and dance in the thrill and joy of life, and Lord, please help me to even enjoy a cookie or two now and then.  Praise you lord God, in Jesus’ holy name I ask this knowing that you will not withhold any good thing from your children.  Amen.Live fully,Love openly,Trust God, and make a difference, today.P.S.  And enjoy a pinwheel cookie on me.  Chaz Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 September 9, 2017 at 9:52 pm Thanks George, I am glad you liked it. Blessings to you and yours. Chaz Reply Yes, the joy of the LORD is our strength! I can’t get the picture you so apply painted out of my head! And every time I get crumbs on me I will be thinking of the cookie lady and the joy that God gives us in our lives! Thanks for the delightful picture of God’s love and care and how we should respond to Him! InspirationBy Charles TowneA chapter from my upcoming book, WHO CARES?  A collection of 101 sympathetic and at times humorous stories from a caregiver’s life.I’m sorry, but I like to watch people.  And no, I am not a peeping tom, but you know what I mean.  Say you are in a public place such as a shopping mall, or your local Wal-mart and you see somebody acting a tad squirrely…  How often have we seen people do weird, even screwball things?  Not long ago I was in my favorite grocery store, and as I entered the cookie isle; I was taking a shortcut to the produce section. (naturally I wasn’t there to buy cookies,) I couldn’t help but notice a very happy, middle-aged lady sitting on the floor.This in its own right was a tad peculiar, but what really got my attention was the fact that she had removed several boxes and packages of cookies from the shelf, and having opened each of the packages she was wolfing down the sweet little morsels like there was no tomorrow!    The lady, who I will now refer to as, “The Cookie Lady,” had packages of cookies scattered all around her on the floor.   Oh my, oh my, oh my, there were Keebler’s, Oreo’s, and Little Debbie’s; a box of Graham crackers, (personally I like my graham crackers dunked in milk.)There were Archway’s, Pinwheels, and Fig Newtons, as well as sugar cookies.   The Cookie Lady’s cheeks were all puffed out as she chewed, and she was eating those sweet little morsels like she was in a cookie-eating contest.  Melted chocolate was smeared on her face and she had cookie crumbs all over her blouse and in her lap.   Her eyes were half closed in a comatose state of cookie-induced euphoria.   As I walked past her she glanced up at me with an anxious expression and clutched a package of Oreos to her chest with one hand while jamming a fistful of Oreos into her mouth with the other.   I want you to know something; that dear soul was not going to share her cookies with anyone!After watching The Cookie Lady gorge, I continued on my way to the produce section.  Yeah, really!  I needed to see that dear soul as she got her sugar fix; it did me a lot of good, it was sort of a reality check.  I know some folks who spurn meat.  They wouldn’t, (to hear them tell it,) eat meat if they were starving, but that same person will eat a double banana split with a strawberry milk shake chaser and a side dish of chocolate sundae to top it off without a thought!   Yep, people are definitely interesting creatures.  And speaking of people, I am acquainted with some mighty miserable folks; yes sirree bob, miserable, and mean.  Look at them, and their faces are all screwed up like they were sucking on lemons.Scowling, unhappy, grumpy in their self righteousness like their crappy attitude toward life was going to make them, well, holy or something.  Better they eat a cookie don’t’cha know.  To my way of thinking Christians should be the happiest people on earth, but then, what do I know?  Whatever you do, do it for the joy of it.  Believe me, when you do something reluctantly, and are miserable in the doing, it will shorten your life,   therefore whatever you do, and this includes care giving, enjoy it.I would certainly say that the Cookie Lady was darned well enjoying those cookies, perhaps just a tad to excess, but she was happy; at least for the moment, but, any moment I expected to hear the store’s intercom declare that there was an emergency on the cookie isle.  Whatever you do, do all to the glory of God and be happy in the doing.   Now that’s living charles towne Please enter your comment! Great story,enjoyed it! Is it a subtle request for more of those cookies i gave you?center_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Charles Towne is first and foremost a Christian. An octogenarian, author, journalist, wildlife photographer, naturalist, caregiver, and survivor, his life has been and continues to be, a never-ending adventure filled with possibilities never imagined. He has adapted the philosophy that to Live fully, laugh uproariously, love passionately, and learn like there is no tomorrow, is a formula for a long and joy filled life. September 3, 2017 at 6:11 pm September 22, 2017 at 12:43 pm Rick, what sort of guy do you think I am! For your information I couldn’t be that subtle even if I tried> Well, when are you going to bring some more of those delicious cookies? See, that is about as subtle as I can be. Chaz Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Reply Reply September 3, 2017 at 9:59 pm charles towne LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Enjoyed the story September 8, 2017 at 8:29 am Please enter your name here Rick 5 COMMENTSlast_img read more

Social Houses in Motta di Livenza / Matteo Thun & Partners

first_imgphotographs:  Daniele DomenicaliPhotographs:  Daniele DomenicaliSave this picture!© Daniele DomenicaliRecommended ProductsWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalDoorsdormakabaEntrance Doors – Revolving Door 4000 SeriesDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Curved Hinged Door | AlbaText description provided by the architects. A.T.E.R. (L’Azienda territoriale per l’edilizia residenziale) in Treviso is a social institution that helps to relief housing problems and supports other public entities in order to give appropriate answers to pressing needs for public intervention in the territory that these subjects can not, often for lack of funds, individually provide.Save this picture!© Daniele DomenicaliThe new collective eco-friendly building in Motta di Livenza (Treviso, Italy) rises up in a residential area close to the historic centre, overlooking the “Santuario della Madonna dei Miracoli”. The project responds to the needs of public administration to find innovative solutions in the field of subsidised buildings or council houses. Save this picture!© Daniele DomenicaliThe house involves the use of ecological materials applied to the building technology of pre-fabricated wood houses. By using the typical layout of the existing council houses in the area, it blends harmoniously with the natural environment. It keeps its performance and its functionality in a contemporary way.Save this picture!© Daniele DomenicaliThe ground floor features a large colonnade that leads to the internal courtyard. Designed as an evergreen garden, it gives breath to the internal rooms overlooking at it. The building is organized over three floors. Using the classic technology of concrete and brick buildings for the ground floor, the other levels have a wood structure and pre-fabricated panels. A second layer of wooden plates covers the whole building and acts as a “brise soleil”. It partially hides and lightens up the “monolithic” volume. Save this picture!© Daniele DomenicaliA Pre-fabricated solution that is not only respecting the low budget category of financed buildings but also approaches the user quality in a individual an eco-friendly way.Save this picture!SectionProject gallerySee allShow lessAD Classics: The National Art Schools of Cuba / Ricardo Porro, Vittorio Garatti, Rob…Architecture ClassicsTime-Lapse: One World Trade CenterArticlesProject locationAddress:Motta di Livenza, ItalyLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/423360/social-houses-in-motta-di-livenza-matteo-thun-and-partners Clipboard Apartments ArchDaily CopyApartments•Motta di Livenza, Italy ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/423360/social-houses-in-motta-di-livenza-matteo-thun-and-partners Clipboard Architects: Matteo Thun & Partners Area Area of this architecture project Social Houses in Motta di Livenza / Matteo Thun & PartnersSave this projectSaveSocial Houses in Motta di Livenza / Matteo Thun & Partners 2010 Year:  Save this picture!© Daniele Domenicali+ 11 Share “COPY” 2010 Area:  3685 m² Area:  3685 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Photographs Italy Projects Year:  Social Houses in Motta di Livenza / Matteo Thun & Partners CopyAbout this officeMatteo Thun & PartnersOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsMotta di LivenzaHousingItalyPublished on September 12, 2013Cite: “Social Houses in Motta di Livenza / Matteo Thun & Partners” 12 Sep 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abstract EarthPartitionsSkyfoldMarkerboard Finish for Folding WallsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesKingspan Insulated PanelsInsulated Wall Panels – Designwall R-seriesWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMBricksNelissenSpecial Bricks – Slips and HalvesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta cladding in Le TrèfleEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEASideboardsUSMLow Shelving – HallerTable LampsLeds-C4Lighting – ElampMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Young radio presenter murdered in Petén

first_img News News August 21, 2020 Find out more Organisation Follow the news on Guatemala Receive email alerts Guatemala. Don’t put the Guatemalan press in quarantine! RSF_en Reporters Without Borders today voiced shock and dismay at the murder of Miguel Ángel Amaya Pérez, a young presenter on Sabana radio, who was found shot dead in Santa Elena, in the Petén department in the north of the country.Miguel Ángel Amaya Pérez, aged 23, had worked at the radio, regularly presenting the news, for two months when he was ambushed by armed men, after taking his wife on his motorbike to a village near Santa Elena on 9 December 2007. His body was found the following day.His family said they did not believe it was a robbery because nothing was stolen from him and his bike remained at the murder scene. The local press reported that the region is infested by drug-traffickers and other criminals. “We offer our condolences to the family of Miguel Ángel Amaya Pérez and we hope that the authorities will solve this distressing case as quickly as possible,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“The north of Guatemala is particularly affected by organised crime and drug-trafficking. The reasons for the murder are still to be determined but the professional link should not be ignored. The investigation should follow this lead,” it added. News GuatemalaAmericas center_img May 8, 2020 Find out more Guatemala: 51 Signatories Call For Authorities To Drop Criminal Charges Against Indigenous Journalist Anastasia Mejía GuatemalaAmericas January 7, 2021 Find out more to go further News Help by sharing this information Red alert for green journalism – 10 environmental reporters killed in five years December 14, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Young radio presenter murdered in Peténlast_img read more

Journalist escapes attack on her home by armed men

first_img Nigerian news site deliberately blocked, expert report confirms Reporters Without Borders today voiced its concern after armed men burst into the apartment block of Janet Mba, editor of the magazine The Scroll in Arepo in Ogun State in south-western Nigeria. She escaped attack because she managed to call the police before they could strike.The worldwide press freedom organisation recorded at least 10 cases of physical assaults and eight cases of threats against journalists in the country during 2008.Around 15 men launched their attack at 2am on 15 January, getting inside the apartment block where Janet Mba lives, in a journalists’ neighbourhood known as “Journalists’ Village”. After neutralising several neighbours and the watchman they asked where she lived. Mba managed to call police before they reached her home. A squad of officers led by the Lagos State police commissioner, Marvel Akpoyibo, were quickly on the spot. The assailants fled after an exchange of fire with the police and before they could be identified. An investigation has been opened to try to discover the reason for the attack.“This incident is the latest in a long list of violence, threats and intimidation of all kinds against Nigerian journalists in the past months”, Reporters Without Borders said. “We urge the local authorities to handle this case with the utmost rigour and to do everything possible to find those responsible and bring them to trial. It is vital that steps are taken to protect Janet Mba and her family”, the organisation added. Organisation to go further RSF_en News Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information NigeriaAfrica NigeriaAfrica Follow the news on Nigeriacenter_img News Twitter blocked, journalism threatened in Nigeria News June 10, 2021 Find out more February 8, 2021 Find out more News Nigerian investigative journalist forced to flee after massacre disclosures January 20, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist escapes attack on her home by armed men January 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

New England Patriots Foundation Donates $100,000 to Cape Cod Community College for New STEM…

first_img Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 New England Patriots Foundation Donates $100,000 to Cape Cod Community College for New STEM Building Pinterest Previous articleWhen antidepressants aren’t enough, add-on therapies may make a difference for those with depressionNext articleBiorasi Welcomes Dermatologist Dr. Lawrence Green to Scientific Advisory Board Digital AIM Web Support Pinterest John Cox, President of Cape Cod Community College, Kathy McNamara, CEO of Cape Cod Community College Educational Foundation and Trish Kennedy, Founder and COO of Zudy and Co-Chair of the “The Future is Now” Capital Campaign WhatsAppcenter_img Local NewsBusiness Facebook WhatsApp Twitter TAGS  Twitterlast_img read more

Calls for the upgrade of the A2 Buncranna road in Derry

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Calls for the upgrade of the A2 Buncranna road in Derry WhatsApp Calls have been made to begin the process of upgrading the A2 Buncranna road in Derry with claims that it’s causing a delay of business development in the area.A proposal to widen the road was first submitted eleven years ago with a public consultation on the project beginning in 2007.A route was identified two years ago however further work has yet not begun.Local Councillor Tony Hasson is calling on the newly appointed Infrastructure Minister for the North Chris Hazzard to look at possibilities of upgrading the road:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/A2buncranna1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Facebook By admin – May 29, 2016 Google+center_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Homepage BannerNews Google+ Previous articleCavan beat Armagh to reach Ulster semi-finalNext articleMcHugh to address the issues people face returning to Ireland admin Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more